Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Sh on CD-ROM; *Shrew* Productions; Popularity
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0933.  Friday, 18 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Judie Porter <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Nov 1994 12:47:58 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0927  Qs: Shakespeare on CD-ROM
 
(2)     From:   Jim Helsinger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Nov 1994 13:41:18 -0500
        Subj:   RE: Taming of the Shrew
 
(3)     From:   David Levine <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Nov 1994 22:33:08 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0917 Qs: Sh Grammar...
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Judie Porter <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Nov 1994 12:47:58 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0927  Qs: Shakespeare on CD-ROM
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0927  Qs: Shakespeare on CD-ROM
 
To Todd Lidh
 
I just read the Education Technology News of Nov. 8, 1994, and they mention a
new product--Extensive Shakespeare Collection on CD-ROM, coming out next year.
It is called Editions and Adaptions of Shakespeare, and is a full-text database
of the major historical editions and theater adaptions of William Shakespeare.
It's from Chadwyck-Healey.  Says it will include complete text of 11 major
editions from the First Folio to the Cambridge edition of 1863-66.  24
contemporary quarto and octavo editions, selected apocryphal plays and more
than 100 adaptions. Sorry, I sound like a sales person, but I'm copying this
off the announcement.  Also includes a phone number 800 752-0515. Maybe this
will help.
 
Judie Porter, Media Specialist, Portsmouth Schools, R.I.

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Helsinger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Nov 1994 13:41:18 -0500
Subject:        RE: Taming of the Shrew
 
>There's obviously something wrong with my e-mail. It recorded Jim Helsinger as
>claiming that Kate's final words represent " a speech of growth for her as a
>person". Ho ho. Could somebody tell me what he actually wrote
 
I e-mailed a personal reply, which Terence Hawkes <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 > has
asked me to share:
 
>I did not say the *words* represent "a speech of growth"...
>I said that is the way the speech needs to be played. Very different things.
If, at the end of the play, that >speech sounds like Kate is less of a person
or a worse-off person  the audience hates the speech, hates Kate, >hates the
play.  That's my experience.
 
>I didn't say the speech was stroll in the park and a moral for all time.
Times have changed, thank god, since >1600, and the speech is hard to
swallow, and full of lots of things that are hard to say or approve of. I
>totally agree with that.  And there is room for productions like the RSC,
where Kate ends up a brain-washed >automaton. BUT the audience, I think, then
hates the speech, hates Kate, hates the play.
 
>I have much more to say on this speech as I just heard it about 50 times in
auditions this week and have >done the playin four full productions. Write
back with your opinion.
 
At Terence Hawkes's request, I would like to open this topic of the play and
the last speech to more discussion. it's a sticky wicket and I'm happy to hear
more comments, questions, ways you have seen it done, or would like to, etc.
Particularly how to deal with this play to todays modern audience. I am well
aware that it was written for a different time period, but we still have to
perform it today.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Levine <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 17 Nov 1994 22:33:08 -0500
Subject: 5.0917 Qs: Sh Grammar...
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0917 Qs: Sh Grammar...
 
This is of couse a complex phenomenon, and just about everyone feels free to
expound upon it, since all you need to do so is a bright idea. I figure that
there are certain commercial considerations.  There is also the notion of a
"fit" and even the fact that a certain company over time will establish a
pattern of doing certain plays, so that each new director and actor will want a
crack at it (think of the RSC and its periodic cycles of the wars of the roses
plays done by Barton and Hall, Bogdanov, Hands, Noble, etc).  Then there is the
fact that plays may have to wait to find their audiences (I forget the gap
between productions of Troilus and Cressida, but I remember it as being a
couple of hundred years, and in the '60's it was all the rage (pace Vietnam),
but has since become a tad less popular.  Don't forget that for a hundred fifty
years or so, they just didn't perform the real Lear.  I'm not sure, but you
might check Robert Weimann's work to see if he has anything to say about
this.....
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.