1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0934.  Sunday, 20 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Nov 1994 16:55:43 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0932 Re: Two Jaques
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Nov 1994 22:24:53 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0932 Re: Two Jaques
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 18 Nov 1994 16:55:43 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 5.0932 Re: Two Jaques
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0932 Re: Two Jaques
 
Regarding Thomas Hall's post:
 
******************************************
One of these Jaques is a pun on the Elizabethan word for outhouse. I
think that pun is rightly Monsieur Melancholy, and not the Jaques of whom
"report speeks goldenly of his profit."
********************************************
 
"Jakes" STILL means "toilet" in certain Northern Irish dialects.
 
Vocabulary Trivia:  It isn't just for breakfast anymore.
 
Cheerfully,
Bradley Berens
Dept. of English
UC Berkeley
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 18 Nov 1994 22:24:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 5.0932 Re: Two Jaques
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0932 Re: Two Jaques
 
Hello all.
 
This is just a thought regarding the Jacques/Jacques debate.  I read AYLI about
a month ago, and was struck by the resemblance to Hamlet.  I mean, Hamlet is
saddled with about eighteen definitions of his masculinity and maturity (or the
lack thereof)--soldier, scholar, courtier, glass of fashion, mold of form (not
quite the same thing), son of Hamlet, Sr., usurped heir, statesman (according
to Laertes, this is why he cannot carve for himself), playboy (according to
Polonius).
 
Anyway, AYLI strikes me as an anatomy of Hamlet's overdetermined subjectivity.
Hamlet, I think, escapes eventually by choosing a fatalistic and existential
(or is it Augustinian?) sense of self.  In AYLI, each of the various
characteristics has its day, bodied forth in single personifications--Orlando
as athlete, then (superficial, one suspects) lover, Oliver as inheritor,
Touchstone as lecher, and so forth.
 
Jacques and Jacques represent two ideas very closely related:  academia and
melancholy.  At this time of year, the connection is particularly intuitive.
 
Ciao!
        Sean.

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