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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Studies of Renaissance Drama
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0938.  Monday, 21 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 11:44:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
(2)     From:   William Proctor Williams <TB0WPW1@NIU.BITNET>
        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 94 15:05 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
(3)     From:   Michael Friedman <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 16:18:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
(4)     From:   David Levine <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 18:29:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0935 Q: Studies of ...
 
(5)     From:   Melissa Aaron <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 19:33:34 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0935 Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 11:44:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
Bill:
 
My students (and I) find Kastan/Stallybrass, *Staging the Renaissance*, very
useful, both in itself and as an introductory smorgasbord giving a taste of all
manner of current works which may later be consumed in their entirety. We also
like Dollimore's *Radical Tragedy*, and are much taken with Belsey's *Subject
of Tragedy*.
 
Cheers,
Skip
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <TB0WPW1@NIU.BITNET>
Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 94 15:05 CST
Subject: 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
Good point!.  I also have that problem/feeling when talking to grad. students.
However, what the old heads said does, I think, remain very true.  I can,
however, recommend Dennis Kay's biography of Shakespeare (recently published in
paperback in the US), Peter Erickson's +Rewriting Shakespeare, Rewriting
Ourselves+, and almost anything by Messrs. Hawkes, Dollimore, Sinfield, and
Holderness.  Just have your student do a search for these on the MLA Bib. on CD
ROM.
 
I do not agree with much of what they say, but they are very diverting.  I
found Hawkes's +That Shakespearian Rag+ and +Meaning by Shakespeare+, along
with Brian Vickers's +Appropriating Shakespeare+ to be the most mirth-making
set of books I have ever read.
 
William Proctor Williams
Northern Illinois University
TB0WPW1@NIU.BITNET
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 16:18:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0935  Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
In response to Bill Godshalk's request for valuable books on Renaissance Drama,
I have found very helpful *The Cambridge Companion to English Renaissance
Drama* edited by A.R. Braunmuller and Michael Hattaway (1990).  It offers
several overview essays that give a very good introduction to the plays of the
period.
 
                                                        Michael Friedman
                                                        University of Scranton
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Levine <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 18:29:03 -0500
Subject: 5.0935 Q: Studies of ...
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0935 Q: Studies of ...
 
Hard to say, and I've been out of the field for a long time, but I'd say that
your sense that nothing as distinguished as the books you've mentioned has been
published recently is pretty sound.  I'd always recommend that students read
Richard Levin's New Readings vs. Old Plays as a prophylactic (as it were)
against falling into grotesque trendiness. Ditto Brian Vickers's recent and
wonderfully angry Appropriating Shakespeare.  It's a book that could save a lot
of wasted time.  Gurr's Playgoing in Shakespeare's London.  Emrys Jones's two
books (Scenic Form in Shakespeare and The Origins of Shakespeare--the latter
more about the drama of the age) are incredibly distinguished.  I haven't
actually read through C.L. Barber's Creating Elizabethan Tragedy, but a friend
of mine likes it very much.  I personally love most of what Anne Barton writes,
and there are some really fine essays in her new book, but it is, after all,  a
colection of essays; her books on Shakespeare and Jonson are superb.
Arelatively obscure book, which I love is Albert Cook's Shakespearean
Enactment, which is really a more general study of Renaissance theater.  I've
tried to stick with the stuff that's NOT particularly about Shakespeare.  When
you get into Shakespeare, it becomes more complicated.  My own opinion is that
it still doesn't get much better than Goddard and Granville-Barker et al. It
will, as you said, be interesting to see what other people say.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 19:33:34 +0200
Subject: 5.0935 Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0935 Q: Studies of Renaissance Drama?
 
I wouldn't be without several books by Andrew Gurr and John Orrell.  *The
Shakespearean Stage*  *Playgoing in Shakespeare's London* * The quest for the
Globe*--ahh.  How about some books by David Bevington--*Action is Eloquence*
leaps to mind.  All this depends, of course, on how serious the student is.
Tell them to read Chamber, Bentley, et.al.  as well--good for the soul.
Shakespeare, of course, was also written before said student was born.
 
M. Aaron (circa. 1964).
Melissa Aaron
University of Wisconsin-Madison
 

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