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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Productions of *Shrew*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0939.  Monday, 21 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 11:53:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0936  Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
(2)     From:   Shirley Kagan <
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        Date:   Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 04:06:24 -1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0936 Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
(3)     From:   Annalisa Castaldo <ANNAL@TEMPLEVM>
        Date:   Monday, 21 Nov 94 08:31:03 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0933  Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
(4)     From:   Juliet A. Youngren <
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        Date:   Monday, 21 Nov 1994 09:13:31 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Taming of the Shrew
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 11:53:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0936  Re: *Shrew* Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0936  Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
This is an extreme instance of a performable feminist critique of *Shrew*, and
of deeply resistant reading:
 
"Yucel Erten, one of Turkey's most talented young directors, turned the play
into a tragedy. . . . Kate arrives at that banquet with a huge shawl around her
hands and arms. She speakes that final diatribe of submission, and puts her
hands on the floor, and offers herself to her husband. But she has cut her
veins, and dies."
        (Zeynep Oral, reported in John Elsom, *Is Shakespeare Still Our
        Contemporary*?--1989)
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Shirley Kagan <
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Date:           Sunday, 20 Nov 1994 04:06:24 -1000
Subject: 5.0936 Re: *Shrew* Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0936 Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
In response to David Maier's posting on all-female Tyger's Heart "Shrew":
although it sounds like a wonderful production that handled the final speech in
a creative way, I am left wondering why it is that we still NEED same-sex
casting in order to turn Kate's submission into sexy foreplay.  The obvious
answer is that four hundred years after this play was written we still live in
a society where women are far from being regarded as equal to men.  The reason
that Kate's final speech sticks like a bone in our collective throats is
because the problem is still very much with us.  We recognize it and it upsets
us.  Because of this, "Shrew" is still a highly relevant play.  Why do we need
a sugar coating or a happy, creative ending?  Lets see a "Shrew" that
upsettingly but realistically tells it like it still is for many women in the
world.
 
Shirley Kagan
University of Hawaii
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Annalisa Castaldo <ANNAL@TEMPLEVM>
Date:           Monday, 21 Nov 94 08:31:03 EST
Subject: 5.0933  Re: *Shrew* Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0933  Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
In reference to Jim's question about the last speech of *TS*, I wonder if
anyone else has read the Charles Marowtiz version. I stumbled across it while
doing a study of Shakespearean adaptations. Among other things, he cuts and
rearranges the text so it is clear that Petruchio is deliberately trying to
break Kate. Moreover, the rest of the men in the play are in on his plans. At
one point, late in the play, Kate faints and when she wakes up, Marowitz gives
the lines from the frame section to Petruchio and his helpers. This makes the
brainwashing aspect horribly clear. The final speech is delivered as before a
tribunal and Kate is obviously speaking by rote. In fact, she needs to be
prompted several times before she can finish it. I have never seen this version
played, and it reads as very heavy handed. Still, it was interesting to see
someone admit that this is NOT a feminist play, rather than spend alot of time
and energy playing against the text.
                                    Annalisa Castaldo
                                    Temple University
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Juliet A. Youngren <
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Date:           Monday, 21 Nov 1994 09:13:31 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Taming of the Shrew
 
I've been lurking, but will venture out of my comfortable burrow to offer a
timid opinion ...
 
I personally find that if Kate is played as a horrible HUMAN BEING who badly
needs a lesson, then I can root for Petruchio even though I'm a woman.  It puts
the argument into a HUMAN realm rather than a gender realm.  If she is played
as a spirited woman ahead of her time, then yes, I do "hate the speech, hate
Kate, hate the play."
 
J.A.Y.
 

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