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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: Rose and Globe; Reduced Shakespeare Co.; Casting
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0957.  Sunday, 27 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Michael Friedman <
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        Date:   Friday, 25 Nov 1994 17:03:37 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0948  Rose and Globe Excavations
 
(2)     From:   Thomas Ellis <
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        Date:   Saturday, 26 Nov 1994 11:39:20 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0948  Reduced Shakespeare Company
 
(3)     From:   Thomas Hall <
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        Date:   Sunday, 27 Nov 1994 01:19:55 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Women as men.
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <
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Date:           Friday, 25 Nov 1994 17:03:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0948  Rose and Globe Excavations
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0948  Rose and Globe Excavations
 
In response to Fred Wharton's call for information on the New Globe project,
I'll call attention to Paul Nelsen's article "Transition and Revision at the
Globe" in the Spring 1994 issue of *Shakespeare Bulletin*, which gives a very
detailed account of the current state of affairs.
 
                                                        Michael Friedman
                                                        University of Scranton
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Ellis <
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Date:           Saturday, 26 Nov 1994 11:39:20 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0948  Reduced Shakespeare Company
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0948  Reduced Shakespeare Company
 
I first saw the Reduced Shakespeare Company perform, well before they made it
big, as one of a variety of mime shows, jugglers, and street performers who
gravitate annually to the Oregon Country Faire (sic), an annual hippiefest held
outside of Eugene, Oregon. At that time, they had only two parodies in their
repertoire--Hamlet and Romeo & Juliet. Both were hilarious; I remember in
particular when the guy who played "Juliet", during the balcony scene, ad
libbed on Romeo's line "Call me but love..." by taking him literally...as both
cast and audience burst into hysterics.
 
Later I saw their show "The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged)" and
though it was mostly taken up with the Hamlet/R&J parodies (the rest of the
plays were brief sketches or mere mention, such as a "Rap" Othello and a Julia
Child routine for Titus), it was still quite entertaining. During their Hamlet
routine, for example, they had various parts of the audience enact the
conflicting voices in Ophelia's psyche during the "Nunnery" scene by chanting,
first separately and then in unison, the following: (1) "Maybe, Maybe not!" (2)
"Paint an Inch Thick" and (3) "Cut the crap, Hamlet; My biological clock is
ticking and I want babies NOW!"
 
I haven't seen their "History of America" but they do put on an entertaining
show. But unfortunately, I have no way of contacting them. Check with the
Folger.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Hall <
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Date:           Sunday, 27 Nov 1994 01:19:55 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Women as men.
 
Marty Jukovsky,
 
I have never seen _Lear_ done like that, but I have seen _Twelfth Night_ done
with women playing male roles. Both brother and sister were played by women,
and they actually looked related. (I had trouble telling them apart) Sir Toby
was also played by a woman and with great success. The actress who played Sir
Toby has played other male roles at Northeastern before. I think she has a
flair for it. I'm afraid there wasn't any sort of philosophy given for the
gender swap. I think it came down to a paucity of talented male actors. In any
case it didn't detract from the performance. I thought of it a turnabout, and
as such, fair play.
 
Thomas Hall
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