Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: November ::
Re: *shrew* Productions: *Twelfth Night*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0963.  Tuesday, 29 November 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Shirley Kagan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 28 Nov 1994 09:42:45 -1000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0956 Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 28 Nov 1994 21:12:49 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Fahrenheit's TWELFTH NIGHT
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Shirley Kagan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Nov 1994 09:42:45 -1000
Subject: 5.0956 Re: *Shrew* Productions
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0956 Re: *Shrew* Productions
 
In his posting, John Perry responded in the following manner to my suggestion
that Kate's submission speech at the end of the play should remain un-candy
coated because it continues to be socially recognizable and relevant to many
people today.  He writes:
 
"Most of us, I think, are able to view *Shrew* in its own context, and
recognize that Kate starts out as a severely disturbed young woman in serious
need of help, which she gets from Petruchio."
 
1) Who is "us"?  Which of us are not colored by our beliefs and conditioning to
the extent that we can objectively watch (or read) and judge Kate's situation
without our own baggage, to say nothing of the baggage of our society?
 
2) What, if anything, is gained by viewing *Shrew* in its own context? It may
be interestring to watch as a museum piece portraying the mores of its time and
place, but in producing it today, aren't we, perhaps, looking for other
qualities?
 
3) How do you figure Kate to be a severely disturbed young woman in serious
need of help?  What actions does she take that categorize her so strongly for
you?
 
4) In what way has Petruchio helped Kate, and can we really call his actions
helpful?  Denying a person nourishment?  Browbeating a person into brainwashed
submission?  Some would argue that this constitutes torture, but then again,
many of the world's greatest villains have claimed to do what they've done "in
a good cause".  To what extent do you allow the ends (which in this case are,
at best, dubious) to justify the means?
 
Shirley Kagan.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 28 Nov 1994 21:12:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Fahrenheit's TWELFTH NIGHT
 
I was impressed by Nicholas Rose's production of TWELFTH NIGHT which I saw on
Friday, 25 November. With the exception of Richard Arthur who plays Sir Toby,
the cast is young, and the young actors give this production a great deal of
vitality. Jasson Minakadis plays Orsino as the Godfather in a double-breasted
suit, with no sign of foppishness. This Orsino is definitely NOT "in love with
love."
 
Marni Penning's Viola is sprightly and well-done, and her "courtship" of Olivia
has an interesting sexual ambivalence. Olivia, played by Sharon Polcyn, shows
no sign of passivity. She is dominant and dominating. Since Olivia is much
taller than Viola, the contrast in height tends to emphasize Olivia's power.
 
Fabian disappears from this production, possibly because it is done with only
eleven actors -- and a good deal of obvious doubling. Stephen Skiles plays
Feste as an ironic, guitar strumming man for all seasons. With a few cuts, he
subsumes Fabian's words and actions.
 
Dick Arthur's Sir Toby and Glenn Becker's Sir Andrew are suitably rowdy and
drunken, and Jason McCune's Malvolio reminded me of Phil Hartman playing a
middle manager. Miriam Brown as Maria (and Priest!) is excellent, truly
first-rate.
 
If you live close enough to Cincinnati, I encourage you to see this production.
It's youthful; it's rollicking; it's fun. I laughed. And Ralph Cohen is
obviously lurking somewhere behind the production since he has provided program
notes. Fahrenheit is Cincinnati's Shenandoah Express!?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.