1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0785.  Tuesday, 4 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Julie Dubiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 02:06:13 -040
        Subj:   RE: Schiller's _Robbers_
 
(2)     From:   Michael Field <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 12:21:45 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Women's Roles
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julie Dubiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 02:06:13 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        RE: Schiller's _Robbers_
 
I am dramaturging a production of _The Robbers_, and the director, adaptor and
I have all picked up on allusions to Shakespeare - a little _Hamlet_, a bit of
_Macbeth_, much _Lear_ - you name it.  If anyone out there is familiar with the
play, I would appreciate opinions as to whether this comes from conscious
decisions on Schiller's part to use Shakespeare to make his point - or whether
we're dealing with a tortured, overly well-read student first putting quill to
paper - Thanks -
 
Julie Dubiner
Columbia University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Field <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 12:21:45 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Women's Roles
 
In Sunday's NY Times an article about director Declan Donnellan's all-male
production of As You Like It (coming to the Brooklyn Academy of Music starting
10/4), Mr. Donnellan was quoted as saying: "I've always been irked by the
theory that it was pre-adolescent boys playing girls in Shakespeare. There's
really very little evidence, though I'm intrigued by how hard the academics
defend the idea. It seems to me that Lady Macbeth and Cleopatra could not be
played by children with no sexual experience."
 
I read this statement--particularly the last sentence--and thought, "Eureka! Of
course he's right!" Now my question: is he? Is there any compelling evidence
for boys playing all the women's roles?

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