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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: October ::
Qs: Non-Oedipal *Ham.*; Hotspur; *Rom*; Advanced
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0806. Wednesday, 12 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Oct 94 15:32:24 EST
        Subj:   Dry Humping
 
(2)     From:   Mary Tyler Knowles <
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        Date:   Monday, 10 Oct 1994 22:45:53 -0400
        Subj:   Why does Hotspur shift to rimed verse?
 
(3)     From:   Marcia Hepps <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 11 Oct 1994 10:20:45 EST
        Subj:   Two Queries
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Oct 94 15:32:24 EST
Subject:        Dry Humping
 
Oedipal Closet
 
A couple of related questions: All the video productions and live performances
I've seen of Hamlet seem to base the scene in Gertrude's bedroom on Jones'
oedipal analysis (usually not very subtly). Are there current or recent
"non-oedipal" presentations of the scene? Is there, historically, a particular
production which started this kind of presentation? Is there anything in the
way of stage direction or interior textual evidence that makes it certain the
scene takes place in Gertrude's bedroom?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Tyler Knowles <
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Date:           Monday, 10 Oct 1994 22:45:53 -0400
Subject:        Why does Hotspur shift to rimed verse?
 
My students and I noticed an oddity--to us, at least--at the end of Act IV,
scene 1 where Hotspur shifts into rimed verse for his final speechs in the
scene, a scene in which he has been steadily reviving his courage to face
unsurmountable odds.  Is the effect of the rhyme a bolstering of his heroic
stance or does it undercut him at that moment, make him sound childish?  I
looked for other instances in Henry IV, Part One of rimed verse and find it
only in these heated moments of patriotic passion such as "Harry to Harry
shall, hot horse to horse,/Meet, and ne'er part til one drop down a course." or
"My father and Glendower being both away,/The powers of us may serve so great a
day./Come, let us take a muster speedily./Doomsday is near. Die all, die
merrily."  Even Douglas falls under the sway of all this rime (one of my
students postulated that his speech shows how much under Hotspur's influence he
has become): "Talk not of dying, I am out of fear/Of death or death's hand for
this one half year."
 
(3) ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcia Hepps <
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Date:           Tuesday, 11 Oct 1994 10:20:45 EST
Subject:        Two Queries
 
I will be directing Romeo and Juliet in the spring and due to time constraints
must cut it unmercifully. Any books, articles, words of wisdom about cutting
the Bard, R&J specifically.
 
Also I will be teaching an advanced acting class around Shakespeare and would
be glad to hear from anyone who has worked in this capacity or anyone who has
suggestions for Texts etc. Many thanks in advance.
 
     ---Marcia Hepps    "
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