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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: October ::
Qs: Alabama Sh Fest; Goneril's Death; Trusting Sh;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0814. Saturday, 15 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Mary Leigh <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Oct 1994 13:31:32 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Reference Request: Alabama Shakespeare Festival
 
(2)     From:   Al Cacicedo <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Oct 1994 20:49:51 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   How does Goneril die?
 
(3)     From:   Tom E. Hodges <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Oct 1994 15:10:51 GMT-6
        Subj:   Trusting Shakespeare
 
(4)     From:   David Peck <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Oct 1994 11:28:52 +0059 (EDT)
        Subj:   Miranda
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Mary Leigh <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Oct 1994 13:31:32 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Reference Request: Alabama Shakespeare Festival
 
[Editor's Note: I former member writes the following, inquiring about the
Alabama Shakespeare Festival.  Please send any responses directly to her.
--HMC]
 
I used to belong to SHAKSPER but had trouble keeping up with the amount of
messages I was receiving.  I have a reference request which I would appreciate
your forwarding to the list.
 
Patron would like information about the Alabama Shakespeare Festival --
history, location, schedule, if possible.  He is also interested in finding out
if the play --The Goodbye People-- written by Herb Gardner has or will be
performed at the Alabama Shakespeare Festival.
 
Robin Leigh

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <
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Date:           Thursday, 13 Oct 1994 20:49:51 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        How does Goneril die?
 
I am teaching *Lear* this semester to a group of first year students who have
posed me a question I cannot answer.  It involves the death of Goneril, who we
are told has been stabbed. The question is, how does the knife come to be in
her?  Edmund says that she "slew herself," but how can he know that?  I can
imagine that Goneril recognizes that the furious Albany will not let her have
her Edmund, and I know that Albany himself says "she is desperate" and tells an
Officer to follow and "govern her." Is this sufficient evidence to declare her
death a suicide?  The issue is complicated by the fact that the Folio has
Goneril exit on the very strong "the laws are mine, not thine;/ Who can arraign
me for't?" whereas the Quarto has her exit on the weak "Ask me not what I
know"--a line that the Folio attributes to the Bastard. Muir's decision to
follow the Quarto reading is explained by what I think is a pretty odd
statement:  "Goneril needs an hysterical, not a defiant, exit line."  Maybe
Edmund "needs" the idea of her committing suicide because of him, and maybe
Albany (and Muir?) "needs" to think that Goneril has become hysterical, and
that her wandering womb will be amenable to good masculine government; but I
wonder in what sense *she* "needs" to be weak at this point.  Maybe I just
should "Reason not the need"?
 
Hoping that this is not too insignificant a question, I remain
 
Virtually yours,
Al Cacicedo (
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Albright College
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom E. Hodges <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Oct 1994 15:10:51 GMT-6
Subject:        Trusting Shakespeare
 
"When in doubt, trust Shakespeare."  This idea, if not these exact words, one
hears from teachers and directors explaining business in particular scenes.
Does this axiom derive from Harley Granville- Barker's _Prefaces to
Shakespeare_, where he writes, "Gain Shakespeare's effects by Shakespeare's
means when you can; for plainly, this will be the better way" (23)?  Or did
someone else write the phrase "trust Shakespeare"?
 
After using the expression in class, I was asked by a student about the source
and couldn't recall.  Help, anyone?
 
Trusting, Tom Hodges
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Peck <
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Date:           Friday, 14 Oct 1994 11:28:52 +0059 (EDT)
Subject:        Miranda
 
I have assigned to a pair of young actors the wood-shifting scene from Tempest.
 My Miranda finds the scene boring and shallow, and the character simple and
uninteresting.  I am currently in the process of inciting both of them to a
much closer look at the given circumstances of the moment and the motivations
and constraints acting upon each of the characters (you need not bother to tell
me that there _are_ no characters involved, I have followed that argument
through all its permutations on this list already).
 
I find ample grounds for interesting work on the scene, but I would love to
hear a few "takes" from others on the list to spice the pot up a little.
Anything anyone would like to share on this particular sequence?
 
Thanks
david peck
 

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