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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: October ::
Re: Boys; Advanced Acting; Editing; *AYL*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0816. Monday, 17 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 13 Oct 1994 23:15:01 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0807  Re: Boys or Female Impersonators?
 
(2)     From:   Norman J. Myers <
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        Date:   Friday, 14 Oct 1994 13:03:37 -0400
        Subj:   Advanced Acting
 
(3)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM.BITNET>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Oct 94 07:02:05 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0762  Re: Innogen
 
(4)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM.BITNET>
        Date:   Saturday, 15 Oct 94 07:43:21 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0805  Productions: 2 *AYL*s and Feinnes in *Ham.*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Thursday, 13 Oct 1994 23:15:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0807  Re: Boys or Female Impersonators?
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0807  Re: Boys or Female Impersonators?
 
I've read Jim Forse's comments on the boy and young men actors with interest,
but I have a question. Is Jim suggesting that some or all of the actors in a
company could and, indeed, did play female roles?  Were female roles rarely or
never played by boys in the adult companies?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <
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 >
Date:           Friday, 14 Oct 1994 13:03:37 -0400
Subject:        Advanced Acting
 
>Also I will be teaching an advanced acting class around Shakespeare and would
>be glad to hear from anyone who has worked in this capacity or anyone who has
>suggestions for Texts etc. Many thanks in advance.
 
Try:  Robert Barton STYLE FOR ACTORS; Robert Cohen ACTING IN SHAKESPEARE;
Cicely Barry THE ACTOR AND HIS TEXT.  Kathleen Conlin of Ohio State has done
a lot of work teaching younger actors Shakespeare.  You may try contacting
her.  See also Robert Barton, "Strutting and Fretting: Shakespeare and the
Novice Actor" THEATRE JOURNAL 33 (May 1981): 231-245.  The John Barton
series of tapes made with the Royal Shakespeare is good, but very expensive
to rent.  The book based on the tapes may be useful.  Good Luck
 
Norman Myers

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM.BITNET>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Oct 94 07:02:05 EDT
Subject: 5.0762  Re: Innogen
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0762  Re: Innogen
 
A note passed from the kids at the back of the bus about T. Hawkes' warning
about the dismal politics of textual editing.
|
Innogen and her many (much more interesting) textual playmates that romp around
in the q's and f's of the Bard's plays sit there for the free discussion of all
observers.  They're all fair game.  Today as in the past a lot of folk have
turned very grumpy as they earned their spurs as textual critics or as editors.
It's hard, grinding work, alas.  And much of it gets done in intellectual
trenches, ugly hand to hand combat where one must show that some dude who spent
eleventy-six years editing R&J blundered over a comma in 2.6, even though the
rest of the work went flyingly.
 
But just because the trench warfare happened back then and continues noisily
below, that doesn't prevent the rest of us from dancing on the parapets. I have
to facedown editorial gradgrinds once in a while with Toby's "Dost thou think
that because thou art virtuous there shall be no more cakes and ale?"
 
Shhh.  We've got them surrounded!  They are not our masters; they're our
servants.  And when as servants they get out of line, they can be corrected
gently or just told to go elsewhere.  That's why we invented the xerox
machine.
 
Of course, don't expect a surly or ill-treated servant to publish your next
essay in a journal that that hard-working drudge also happens to edit.  Dancing
on the parapet while the heavy infantry is still firing does have a certain
risk. You pays y'er money and you takes y'er chance.
 
              As ever,
                        Steve Urjauntywitz
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM.BITNET>
Date:           Saturday, 15 Oct 94 07:43:21 EDT
Subject: 5.0805  Productions: 2 *AYL*s and Feinnes in *Ham.*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0805  Productions: 2 *AYL*s and Feinnes in *Ham.*
 
The Cheek By Jowl AS YOU LIKE IT that played at the Brooklyn Academy of Music
last week demonstrated, alas, how delicate effort in drama may collapse into
high camp during a long run, even when done by a brilliant company.  I was one
of the happy few who saw it when it opened on its long tour, first at an
International Theatre Festival at SUNY StonyBrook on Long Island three years
ago.  The tentative explorations of sexuality in the three years' run have
turned into music hall/montypythonesque caricatures, with a few exceptions.
Celia "back then " only slowly discovered her own jealous need for Rosalind,
and even delicately allowed herself to feel the sexual attraction of that
creature.  When I saw the same performer last week do the job, Celia was a
Margaret Thatcher clone, groping Rosalind's thighs from the first few lines of
dialogue.  Oops.
 
Yes there was still great wonder in the show, but it was safe.  The men/women
were now in those categories of easy disdain.  When I saw it first, we in the
audience all were surprised and alarmed at how we were charmed and excited by
the ambiguities of sexual attraction reaching out off that stage.  This time
there were only effects of laughter through alienation rather than self
recognition.
 
Given the wonderful artistic freedom that the director granted these actors,
encouraging them to take immense artistic risks, I can see that they may have
had no way to recover every night, night after night, out there in Tokyo or
Australia or Brooklyn. Maybe for the next tour that this heartbreakingly
talented production group tries, maybe they could mount a repertory so Celia
could spend two nights being Edmund and the Bastard Faulkenbridge to return
only on Tuesday and Saturday to the other intensities and delicacies of Celia
as a lad/lady.
                        As ever,
                               Steve Urkowitz,  
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