1994

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0843.  Tuesday, 25 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Oct 1994 10:54:03 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0838 Re: *Tmp.*; Prospero; *Prospero's Books*
 
(2)     From:   Arthur Pearson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 24 Oct 1994 16:39:22 -0600
        Subj:   Tempest
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kenneth S. Rothwell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Oct 1994 10:54:03 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0838 Re: *Tmp.*; Prospero; *Prospero's Books*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0838 Re: *Tmp.*; Prospero; *Prospero's Books*
 
        Another comment about Greenaway's Prospero's Books:
 
Peter Greenaway isn't in the business of making his films easy for anybody.
Compared to The Draftsman's Contract, though, Prospero's Books is relatively
linear and continuous. Greenaway loves images as much as Joyce loved words. In
a way some of our dropout students who avidly watch MTV may be better prepared
to cope with his post-modernist, Godard-ish, ways than their teachers. For some
reason, Tempest has attracted daring, avant-garde filmmakers. See, for example,
Derek Jarman's punk 1980 Tempest, or Paul Mazursky's 1982 recontextualization,
The Tempest. Could it be because Tempest exposes the tension between power and
knowledge that haunts the contemporary liberal agenda? Anyway Greenaway's movie
may not seem on the surface to represent Tempest literally but it tears the
text apart to reconstitute it for modern readings. Don't condemn it out of hand
but wait six beats, at least. Ken Rothwell
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Pearson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 24 Oct 1994 16:39:22 -0600
Subject:        Tempest
 
In response to Leslie Harris,
 
A modern, more adaptation than version, of The Tempest is an interesting
one with Raul Julia, Susan Sarandon, John Cassavetes and his wife.
 
Available on video, circa mid 70's?
 
Arthur Pearson

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