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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: October ::
Re: Multimedia Sh; Jacobi Hamlet; Diet/Size; Middle
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0868.  Sunday, 30 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   David Evett <R0870@TAONODE>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Oct 1994 15:56 ET
        Subj:   Multimedia Shakespeare
 
(2)     From:   Lonnie J. Durham <
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        Date:   Friday, 28 Oct 1994 16:31:40 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Jacobi's Hamlet
 
(3)     From:   John Cox <COX@HOPE.BITNET>
        Date:   Saturday, 29 Oct 1994 10:42:30 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0864  Re: Diet and Size
 
(4)     From:   James Harner <
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        Date:   Saturday, 29 Oct 1994 14:13:06 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0866  Q: Shakespeare in Middle School
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870@TAONODE>
Date:           Friday, 28 Oct 1994 15:56 ET
Subject:        Multimedia Shakespeare
 
I can't offer any significant instances of effective use of video in
Shakespearean production, but that it could be so used I have not doubt, on the
basis of the uneven but stimulating <St. Joan> at the Shaw Festival in 1993.
Here, Mary Haney as Joan sat through almost the entire trial scene with her
back to the audience, facing her inquisitors (who thus became the audience's
inquisitors as well). But a camera relayed a close-up image of her face to a
set of large monitors at either side, registering every flicker of response.
Tough task for an actor, to maintain total concentration under such pitiless
scrutiny for so long.  Rewarding, however, for an audience.  Consider the
possibilities for soliloquies, dream/vision sequences (Hamlet, Brutus, Richard
III and Henry Tudor, Macbeth, Posthumus).  Large-screen projections of
<Tempest> 1.1 may be an expensive but in some ways easy out of that
theatrically challenging scene. And so on. I seem to remember reading about
holographic ghosts. Anybody else fill in?
 
Electronically,
Dave Evett
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Lonnie J. Durham <
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Date:           Friday, 28 Oct 1994 16:31:40 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Jacobi's Hamlet
 
Just a moment of pleasurable recollection brought on by Marcia Hepps's mention
of Derek Jacobi's performance in the BBC production of *Hamlet*: I had always
heard in my head that line from the "no more marriages" speech as "IT hath MADE
me MAD", but Jacobi (embracing Ophelia during the last part of his rant) looks
up startled, as if in sudden realization, and over Ophelia's shoulder gasps "it
HATH made me mad."  Brilliant I thought at the time, but I haven't seen it
since to confirm my first impression.
 
Cheers, all.
Lonnie Durham
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <COX@HOPE.BITNET>
Date:           Saturday, 29 Oct 1994 10:42:30 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0864  Re: Diet and Size
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0864  Re: Diet and Size
 
Another indicator of size is the replica of the "Mayflower," docked in Plymouth
Harbor, Massachusetts.  I was touring the ship several years ago, being very
careful, at 6' 3" to avoid hitting my head in the below deck area, where the
ship has only six feet of head room.  Then I noticed an explanatory note on one
of the overhead beams.  It explained that the replica was built with its 'tween
deck area a full foot higher than the original, so as to allow for the
increased size of sailors between the early seventeenth century and the mid
twentieth.  In other words, the original ship had only five feet of head room
below decks.
 
John Cox
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Harner <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 29 Oct 1994 14:13:06 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5.0866  Q: Shakespeare in Middle School
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0866  Q: Shakespeare in Middle School
 
Robert Burke's student might want to consult the General Shakespeareana/
General/Pedagogy section of the annual World Shakespeare Bibliography for
discussions of how Shakespeare is used in elementary and middle school classes.
 
                Jim Harner
 

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