1994

Q: Shakespeare in Yiddish

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0791.  Friday, 7 October 1994.
 
From:           Mitchell J. Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Oct 1994 08:04:00 CDT
Subject:        Shakespeare in Yiddish
 
I recently finished reading John Gross' SHYLOCK which gives a very thorough
analysis of the way that character has been regarded and played over the
centuries.
 
One of the more intriguing passages for me concerned the presentations of
MERCHANT OF VENICE, (among other Shakespeare plays), in the Yiddish Theaters of
New York in the earlier part of this century.  Apparently, HAMLET and KING LEAR
were repertory favorites.
 
Could anyone advise me where I might find these Yiddish translations?
 
    Thanks,
    Mitchell Brown
    CHICAGO

Re: Buying the Farm

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0790.  Friday, 7 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Don Rowan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 05 Oct 94 09:45:46 -0300
        Subj:   Buying the farm
 
(2)     From:   Tom E. Hodges <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 6 Oct 1994 11:17:20 GMT-6
        Subj:   Re: 5.0767 Buying the farm
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Rowan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 05 Oct 94 09:45:46 -0300
Subject:        Buying the farm
 
I served in the Army Air Corps during the second world war and heard "buying
the farm" many times, often in poker games when you lost a big pot.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom E. Hodges <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 6 Oct 1994 11:17:20 GMT-6
Subject:        Re: 5.0767 Buying the farm
 
Listen up, Godshalk W L,
 
I can't point you to a print source, but I have heard WWII vets refer to
"buying the farm", meaning specifically cashing in the $10000 life insurance
policy required of troops after they began drawing combat pay.  Speak, old
soldiers.
 
Regards, Tom Hodges

PUL Fellowships

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0788.  Tuesday, 4 October 1994.
 
From:           Stephen Ferguson <0629212%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Mondaaaay, 3 Oct 1994 14:16:07 EDT
Subject:        PUL Fellowships
 
      PLEASE CROSS-POST TO OTHER INTERESTED LISTS!
 
 
VISITING FELLOWSHIPS 1995-1996
Princeton University Library
 
 
The Friends of the Princeton University Library are sponsoring several
short-term Visiting Fellowships in order to promote scholarly use of the
research collections of the Library. The  Department of Rare Books and Special
Collections, housed in the Harvey S. Firestone Library, has substantial
holdings of materials pertaining to the western world and the Middle East  from
antiquity to the present.  The Rare Book Division is especially strong in
classical Latin texts, American history and  literature, English history and
literature, and French, German, and Latin American literature.  The Manuscript
Division holds Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts and codices, and American
and English literary and historical manuscripts.  The Visual  Materials
Division services the Graphic Arts Collection, the  Collection of Historic
Maps, the Theatre Collection, and the Numismatic Collection.  The Seeley G.
Mudd Manuscript Library holds the Public Policy Papers and the University
Archives.  The  Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology and the Gest Oriental
Library and East Asian Collections are also located on the University campus.
 
The Fellowships, which have a value of $1500 each, are meant to  help defray
expenses in traveling to and from Princeton and residing in Princeton during
the tenure of the Fellowship.  The length of the Fellowship will depend on the
applicant's research proposal, but is normally one month.   Fellowships are
tenable  from May 1995 to April 1996.
 
There is no special application form.  Applicants are asked to  submit a rsum
and a brief research proposal to Fellowship Committee, Princeton University
Library, One Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544.  The proposal should address
specifically the relevance of the Princeton University Library Collections to
the proposed research.  The applicant should also arrange for two confidential
letters of recommendation to be sent to the Committee. The deadline for
applications is 31 January 1995.  This announcement contains all the
information necessary to complete the application process.

Re: Innogen

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0789.  Friday, 7 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Oct 94 16:41 BST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0782 Re: Innogen
 
(2)     From:   Thomas G. Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Oct 1994 11:18:09 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0782  Re: Innogen
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Oct 94 16:41 BST
Subject: 5.0782 Re: Innogen
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0782 Re: Innogen
 
Dear Thomas Hall,
 
The fact that Innogen has no lines certainly does not mean that she does
nothing. The irony of her silent presence on the stage is intense, for instance
in scenes which contain exchanges such as
 
Don Pedro:   ...I think this is your daughter
Leonato:  Her mother hath many times told me so.
 
Ask yourself: what does Innogen (she is the mother directly referred to by
Leonato, her husband, here) do at this moment? All eyes must be on her. For any
competent performer the gestural, kinesic posibilities are considerable --and
this in a play in which one of the central issues is the silence traditionally
urged on married women. Think about it. By the way, I'm by no means the first
to make these observations, nor are others who make them Cultural Materialists,
revolutionaries, or otherwise obviously undesirable. Perhaps you need a better
edition of the play.
 
T. Hawkes
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas G. Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 5 Oct 1994 11:18:09 -0400
Subject: 5.0782  Re: Innogen
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0782  Re: Innogen
 
At the risk of stirring a soundly-sleeping dog, I remind SHAKSPER readers that
John Drakakis and I went ten rounds over the question of Innogen's status a
couple of years ago. Whether or not the discussion was exhaustive, it was at
least exhausting, and those interested in the question may trace its ins and
outs in the SHAKSPER archive. I have no idea what the number of the back-volume
would be, though Hardy Cook could perhaps say.
 
Cheers,
Tom Bishop
 
Editor's Note:
 
In response to the above, I sent the following to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.:
 
//
Database Search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
Search Innogen in SHAKSPER
Index
//
 
This is what I go back:
 
> Search Innogen in SHAKSPER
--> Database SHAKSPER, 16 hits.
 
> Index
Item #   Date   Time  Recs   Subject
------   ----   ----  ----   -------
000759 92/10/29 08:02   47   SHK 3.0278 Re: Hero's Mother
000764 92/10/29 22:29  100   SHK 3.0280 Rs: Hero's Mother
000765 92/10/30 17:46   89   SHK 3.0285 Re: Hero's Mother
000768 92/10/31 10:18   85   SHK 3.0287 Re: Hero's MotherCURRENT
000770 92/11/01 09:49   36   SHK 3.0289 Qs: ASTR-L; Hero's Mother
000771 92/11/01 20:08   72   SHK 3.0290 Much Ado About . . . (Was Hero's Mother)
000772 92/11/01 20:21   42   SHK 3.0291 Rs: ASTR-L Address; Innogen Pun, Plus a+
000775 92/11/02 14:21  100   SHK 3.0294 More on Hero's Mother
000776 92/11/02 14:25   24   SHK 3.0295 R: Doubling Claudius and Ghost
000781 92/11/03 20:43   86   SHK 3.0300 Hero's Mother Again
000786 92/11/06 17:46   59   SHK 3.0305 Rs to Doubling Issues
002609 94/09/19 12:12   67   SHK 5.0741 Re: Universals; Character; *Ado*
002620 94/09/26 12:34   99   SHK 5.0751 Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
002628 94/09/28 13:31   58   SHK 5.0759 Re: Innogen
002632 94/10/01 09:57  120   SHK 5.0762 Re: MND Video; Character; Innogen; Habi+
002649 94/10/04 23:25   45   SHK 5.0782 Re: Innogen
 
--Hardy

Re: Tender Macbeth; Recent *Rom*; 1000 Acres; Brook

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0787.  Tuesday, 4 October 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Naomi Liebler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 3 Oct 94 23:58:00 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0770  Re: Character
 
(2)     From:   Michael Field <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 09:08:44 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Palestinian R&J
 
(3)     From:   Dave Collins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 9:54:00 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0769  Re: 1000 Acres
 
(4)     From:   Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 10:10:30 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0771 Videos: ACT *Shrew* and *MND*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Naomi Liebler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 3 Oct 94 23:58:00 EST
Subject: 5.0770  Re: Character
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0770  Re: Character
 
To ELEpstein who wonders whether anyone has "seen Macbeth as a "tender lover":
if by "seen" you mean "in performance, check out (literally, from your
neighborhood video store) the 1989 (+ or -) film adaptation, *Men of Respect,*
whose director's name I can never remember, but someone on this list will
surely do so. If memory serves, the lead was played by John Turturro. For my
(rental) money, it's a terrific adaptation. And this Macbeth is completely,
credibly, in love with his wife.
 
But ELEpstein's posting piques more curiosity: "a bored Inuit wanderer"? As
the query about *Macbeth* says, "Source here, if possible." Did you make that
up to make a point, or is there a specific narrative to which you refer?
 
--Naomi C. Liebler
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Field <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 09:08:44 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Palestinian R&J
 
Dear Kate Egerton,
 
The Washington Post ran a lengthy article with pictures about the joint
Israeli-Palestinian production of R&J several months back. I was directing R&J
at the time and so xeroxed the article and distributed it to the cast. I would
be happy to send you a copy if you wish.
 
In terms of production, what we found most useful was the observation of the
Palestinian Lady Montague that, for her and her compatriots, the emotional peak
of the play occurs just after the brawl, when Tybalt and Mercutio lie dead, and
Romeo is banished by the Prince.
 
Mike Field
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dave Collins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 9:54:00 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5.0769  Re: 1000 Acres
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0769  Re: 1000 Acres
 
I'd like to take a moment to respond to Stephen Buhler's request for a word or
two from people who had used 1000 Acres in class.  I taught the novel in a
course called "Visions and Revisions" in which we looked at pairs of texts
drawn (usually) from widely separated times and cultures to see how the "same"
story could/would be remade to reflect contemporary cultural conditions.
Other pairs we read were Beowulf/Grendel, The Scarlet Letter/S (Updike),
Dracula/The Vampire Lestat, The Return of Martin Geurre (text was the Harvard
UP version by Davis)/French film of the same name/Somersby.
 
But back to 1000 Acres.  The Lear/1000 Acres combination may well have been the
most successful pairing of the semester.  I've read 1000 Acres four or five
times now and I don't think I will ever read Lear again in quite the same way.
Of course, Shakespeare's play is still Shakespeare's play and Smiley's novel is
still Smiley's novel.  But the latter work does cause one to re-envision the
former.
 
As I prepared the course I went back to look for critical essays that defended
Goneril and Regan, essays of the sort I had read years ago but dismissed as
"fringe" material.  It's harder to do that now.  I discovered this time through
that there is and has been a thriving critical literature on Lear that delves
into the incest theme, on occasion tracing it all the way back to the fairy
tale roots of the story.  Of that I wasn't aware.  That alone has changed the
picture.
 
But perhaps the most significant thing for my students (and myself) was the
opportunity to see things, however confusedly, through Ginny/Goneril's eyes.  I
don't for a minute trust Ginny as a narrator.  She's too defensive, too anxious
to make excuses for herself.  In the opening pages, for example, she recounts
her jealousy of Rose's children and claims blandly "Well, I felt it and I set
it aside."  Trouble is, her actions later demonstrate that she doesn't.  She
has her own "sense of the right order of things" and works, perhaps
unconsciously or half-consciously, to implement that order.  She claims to want
no more than peace in the family circle, and perhaps she genuinely does, but to
attain that peace she makes some very hurtful compromises and hides truths
about her own attitudes (toward Rose, Caroline, her father) even from herself.
After the family spat about dividing the farm, for example, she has a perfect
opportunity to bring about a reconciliation. All she has to do is to call
Caroline.  But she keeps "forgetting," she keeps postponing, and the call never
gets made.  It's not her fault--it just "happens."  And so it goes through the
entire novel.
 
The upshot is that I'm not sure Smiley's Ginny is any more innocent of what
happens than is Shakespeare's Goneril.  What shifts is the perspective from
which we see her.  Realizing that she doesn't have the strength to "come out"
and fight for what she wants (and it is not altogether admirable, what she
wants), we may not approve of what she does, but we are more prone to
sympathize with the human weakness that is all too familiar to us from the
smaller (sometimes) failures in our own lives.
 
I think you and your students will both enjoy and learn a lot from the
comparison of the two works.  As my younger friends might say, "Go for it!"
 
--Dave Collins
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bradley S. Berens <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 4 Oct 1994 10:10:30 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 5.0771 Videos: ACT *Shrew* and *MND*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0771 Videos: ACT *Shrew* and *MND*
 
Regarding a video of the Brook MND, the answer to your question about a
commercially available video is a resounding "No."
 
The RSC, of course, has an extensive video archive, but that's pretty much the
only way to get it.
 
Also, a number of years ago (mid-late 80s) there was a BBC video series called
"Hands Off The Classics" which had an episode dedicated to the Brook MND, with
lots of neat footage.
 
Finally, anyone interested in that production should read David Selbourne's
"The Making of A Midsummer Night's Dream: An Eye-Witness Account of Peter
Brook's Production From First Rehearsal to First Night" (London: Methuen,
1982).  A nice account, although it doesn't address the question regarding
whether what Brook and Co. were trying to achieve is the same thing as what the
audience liked about the show.
 
If I'm wrong about the video, will someone please TELL ME and I'll not only eat
a healthy dinner of crow, but be first on the phone to order the thing.  I'm
sadly confident, however, that the thing isn't available.
 
Regards,
Brad Berens
Dept. of English
UC Berkeley
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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