1994

Re: Sonnet 144; Bianca; ACT Shrew

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0762. Friday, 30 September 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Pat Buckridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Sep 1994 16:46:44 +1000 (EST)
        Subj:   Sonnet #144
 
(2)     From:   Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 29 Sep 94 08:19:08 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0755  Re: Bianca
 
(3)     From:   Joyce Crim <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 28 Sep 1994 15:29:34 -0600
        Subj:   Re: ACT Shrew
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Buckridge <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Sep 1994 16:46:44 +1000 (EST)
Subject:        Sonnet #144
 
To Mary Tyler Knowles:
 
There is what appears to be an analogous usage in Donne's Elegy, 'The
Comparison':
 
'Thine's like the dread mouth of a fir'd gun'
 
(The 'thine' being the genitals of his antagonist's mistress).
 
Pat Buckridge.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ronald Dwelle <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 29 Sep 94 08:19:08 EST
Subject: 5.0755  Re: Bianca
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0755  Re: Bianca
 
>With all due respect to Ronald Dwelle--
        "Shrew" is animalistic, but "bitch" is not???!
 
>Jean Peterson
>Bucknell University
 
In animal terms, "shrew" is vicious, "bitch" is not.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joyce Crim <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 28 Sep 1994 15:29:34 -0600
Subject:        Re: ACT Shrew
 
The ACT production of Shrew, which I saw on televison, was the most enjoyable
Shrew I have seen. The acrobatics around the ship's mast and pirate-type chorus
with noisemakers are  still vivid pictures in my mind. To me the key to success
was in the casting of both Petruchio and Kate as young, attractive, lusty,
physical lovers, who were obviously meant for each other.  As I remember it,
the actors were equally matched in their ability to torment each other.  For
me, their struggle represented a mating-dance, not sexual abuse.  The physical
comedy worked to create a sense of joy.
 
Another production which played up the lusty side of Shrew was the
Burton-Taylor movie. (I seem to remember struggles in haylofts and the omission
of large chunks of text.)
 
My point is that, for today's audiences, one can (if one WISHES) down-play the
sexism of the "taming" by emphasizing the physical compatibility (even
combatibility !) of the lovers.
 
This is my first posting.  As a reader and an audience member, I am a fan of
both scholarship and theatrical productions. Go easy on me, please.
 
If anyone knows of a legal way I can purchase a copy of the ACT Shrew, please
let me know.  Thanks.
 
Joyce Crim

1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0761. Friday, 30 September 1994.
 
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Sep 1994 22:30:05 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        1995 Ohio Shakespeare Conference
 
The topic of 1995 Conference is STAGES FOR SHAKESPEARE: From Court to Couch,
from Central Park to the Cottesloe, from Culture to the Classroom.
 
Featured Speakers are Janet Adelman, Peter Donaldson, and Phyllis Rackin.
 
The Conference will be held at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, on May 11-13,
1995.
 
Papers or 750 word abstracts should be recived on or before January 15, 1994.
 
Please send papers, abstracts, and/or inquiries to:
 
        Sam Crowl
        Department of English
        Ohio University
        Athens OH 45701-2979
 
For the Ohio Shakespeare Conference, I remain,
 
Bill Godshalk

Re: Innogen

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0759.  Wednesday, 28 Sept. 1994.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Sep 1994 22:24:45 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Innogen or Imogen in CYMBELINE
 
(2)     From:   Kathleen Kendrick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 26 Sep 1994 15:05:21 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0741 Re: Universals; Character; *Ado*
 
(3)     From:   Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Sep 1994 15:56:44 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0751  Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Sep 1994 22:24:45 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Innogen or Imogen in CYMBELINE
 
Thomas Hall asks about Innogen which is the Oxford way to spell Imogen. There
is no textual evidence that Shakespeare spelled the name in this way in this
play. In MUCH ADO (in the first stage direction) Leonato's wife is "Innogen."
And Holinshed, one of Shakespeare's sources for CYMBELINE, has "Innogen."
 
By "textual evidence," let me make clear, I mean evidence in early texts of
CYMBELINE. There's plenty of textual evidence other places!
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathleen Kendrick <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 26 Sep 1994 15:05:21 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 5.0741 Re: Universals; Character; *Ado*
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0741 Re: Universals; Character; *Ado*
 
Who or what is Innogen?  I am in class with Tom Hall and would like to know
more.  Thanks Kitty Kendrick
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Fridman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Sep 1994 15:56:44 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.0751  Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0751  Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
 
Thomas Hall,
 
Innogen is a character who appears in the stage directions of *Much Ado* at the
beginning of 1.1 and 2.1 as Leonato's wife.  She is excised from most editions
of the play (although you might be able to find her in the notes on the text
section of your edition).  If you're interested, I wrote an article concerning
her which appears in Theatre Journal 42 (1990): 350-63.
 
                                                        Michael Friedman

Authorship

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0760.  Wednesday, 28 Sept. 1994.
 
From:           Charles Adler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Sep 1994 18:31:17 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0747  Authorship
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0747  Authorship
 
"SHAKESPEARE" IDENTIFIED IN EDWARD DE VERE, SEVENTEENTH EARL OF OXFORD by J.
Thomas Looney, originally published in 1920 is the seminal book. Whatever one
thinks of the conclusion, it is well written and tightly argued, much like
reading a good legal brief (yes, there are some).  My difficulty that I did not
-- still don't -- know enough to assess the accuracy of the "facts" from which
the argument develops.  If the "facts" are accurate, the argument has
persuasive force.

Re: Outsiders

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0758.  Wednesday, 28 Sept. 1994.
 
(1)     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Sep 94 10:34:00 BST
        Subj:   SHK 5.0751 Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
 
(2)     From:   James P. Saeger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 27 Sep 1994 11:43:47 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.0751 Bastards/Outsiders
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Sep 94 10:34:00 BST
Subject: Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
Comment:        SHK 5.0751 Re: Women and Outsiders: Ado
 
For Melissa Aaron,
 
Have a look at Christopher Norris & Richard Machen eds., Poststructuralist
Readings of English Poetry (Cambridge 1987).  There you will find questions
of illegitimacy and "outsiders" addressed.
 
John Drakakis
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James P. Saeger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 27 Sep 1994 11:43:47 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 5.0751 Bastards/Outsiders
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.0751 Bastards/Outsiders
 
As I am wrapping up my dissertation on bastards and bastardy, I wanted to
second Melissa Aaron's fascination with the subject.  I also wanted to add that
while bastards do in part "serve as a tool to voice fears about out-of-control
sexuality and a consequent threat to inheritance," it's important to make some
distinctions about these fears/threats.
 
The category of "out-of-control" sexuality is not one to be taken at face
value.  It is a heavily class- and gender-bound concept in which the culturally
empowered use such ideological constructions as morality, economic entitlement,
and "family values" to control and demonize the disempowered--i.e., poor women
& especially poor single mothers.  As my language indicates, we can see the
currency of many of the same issues in our own (USA, at least) political
climate.
 
Also, the "threat to inheritance" is born of some of the same issues of
ideological control.  Since bastards are primarily associated with their
mothers, any claim to inheritance by bastards (eg., Edmund and Spurio, among
others) threatens the patriachalism founded on hierarchical among others)
threatens the patriachalism founded on hierarchical distinctions between
legitimate & illegitimate, father & mother, etc.
 
That said, I think dramatic characterizations of bastards certainly do provide
excellent "outsiders" for study.
 
 James P. Saeger
 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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