Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: September ::
Qs: MV Characters; 1 Contention
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 0721. Thursday, 8 September 1994.
 
(1)     From:   Robert Lloyd Neblett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 8 Sep 1994 00:58:48 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   MERCHANT characters
 
(2)     From:   Kate Egerton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 07 Sep 94 10:46 EDT
        Subj:   _The First Part of the Contention_ - a vocab ?
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert Lloyd Neblett <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 8 Sep 1994 00:58:48 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        MERCHANT characters
 
I will be directing MERCHANT in the summer of 1995, and need a little advice.
Please inform me of the debates regarding the characters of the "Salads" --
Salerio, Salarino, and Solanio.  I know that David Bevington regards Salerio &
Salarino to be the same person, but I would like to know about relevant
arguments and positions.  My main concern is:  do I leave them as three
characters and deal with casting another actor or do I combine Salerio and
Salarino in order to tidy up the text for my audience and cast?
 
Please respond.
 
Robert Neblett
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kate Egerton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 07 Sep 94 10:46 EDT
Subject:        _The First Part of the Contention_ - a vocab ?
 
Greetings -
 
I have a question about a phrase in _The First Part of the Contention of the
two famous houses of York and Lancaster_, sometimes known as Q of _2 Henry VI_
(it's tempting, but I won't get into that right now).
 
Rather late in the Cade business, there is a scene in _The First_ that has no
analogue in F, between Cade, Dicke, and "a Sargaint." Dicke has "ravish'd" the
Sargaint's wife, and the wronged lawman has come to Cade for "justice of this
fellow here" (bad move on the part of the Sargaint).  Now, my question has to
do with the term Dicke uses to describe part of his action - "paper house." The
only gloss I can find on this phrase is in the Wells & Taylor textual
companion, and Gary Taylor thinks that "paper" is a misprint for "proper,"
meaning own, private, excellent, or some such.  I can buy this (and since the
scene isn't in F, it's not in _Shakespeare's Bawdy_ or any other glossary that
I've found), Dicke is obviously referring to this poor woman's intimate
anatomy, but might "paper" stand in the sense of the role of the Sargaint as a
lawman, and agent of the court?  And is the substitution by a compositor of
"ro" for "a" especially understandable in Secretary hand?
 
If anyone has thoughts on this, I'd love to hear them before I stick my neck
out in my (very small and friendly) seminar next week.
 
 Kate Egerton
 UNC-CH
 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.