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Home :: Archive :: 1994 :: September ::
Re: Universals; Character; *Ado*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 5, No. 741. Monday, 19 September 1994.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Thursday, 15 Sep 1994 17:07:56 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Generalizing about a certain species of ape
 
(2)     From:   Pat Buckridge <
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        Date:   Friday, 16 Sep 1994 15:57:30 +1000 (EST)
        Subj:   Character
 
(3)     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Friday, 16 Sep 94 12:58 BST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 5.0740 Q: *Ado*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Thursday, 15 Sep 1994 17:07:56 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Generalizing about a certain species of ape
 
Denis Donoghue has recently written: "It would be more reasonable to claim that
equality, universality and disinterestedness are sentiments to be imagined, not
states of being or gifts of God to be enjoyed" (TLS July 15, 1994, pp. 4-5). He
is writing about those "who want to sustain the notion that each of us is
spiritually the same, at a level of being far deeper than that of our
differences" (p. 4). Now perhaps "spiritually" is the operative word here,
because later in his essay Donoghue baldly generalizes (or universalizes, if
you will) about our species: "We are social animals" (p. 5).
 
And so, apparently, we are absolutely "social animals" who lack any universal
sentiments. Including the desire to socialize?
 
Is there one species of anthropoid ape about which field biologists cannot
generalize?
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pat Buckridge <
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Date:           Friday, 16 Sep 1994 15:57:30 +1000 (EST)
Subject:        Character
 
Terence Hawkes wants (again) to know how Ralph Cohen has access to Bassanio's
'habit of mind'.  The answer (again) is: by means of INFERENCE, a mental
process familiar to everyone in the world except Cultural Materialists.  But do
we need to start that all over?
 
And by the way -  hear, hear to Bill Godshalk and James Schaefer for their
defence of the text.
 
Pat Buckridge
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Friday, 16 Sep 94 12:58 BST
Subject: 5.0740 Q: *Ado*
Comment:        RE: SHK 5.0740 Q: *Ado*
 
Dear Thomas Hall: For a perfect example of woman as outsider in Much Ado, have
a look at Innogen.
 
T. Hawkes
 

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