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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: February ::
Re: Characters; *H5* Film; Rare Books Course
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0063. Wednesday, 1 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John Cox <COX@HOPE.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 30 Jan 1995 09:36:21 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0054  Q: Migrating Characters
 
(2)     From:   Marty Jukovsky <
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        Date:   Saturday, 28 Jan 95 16:01:26
        Subj:   1989 Henry V
 
(3)     From:   Daniel Traister <
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        Date:   Monday, 30 Jan 1995 21:24:39 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Summer rare book courses at the University of Virginia
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <COX@HOPE.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 30 Jan 1995 09:36:21 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0054  Q: Migrating Characters
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0054  Q: Migrating Characters
 
With regard to characters borrowed by one playwright from another, does
Jaques count in *As You Like It*?  He has often seemed to me to be based on
Jonson's misanthropic satirists that were being staged by the Chamberlain's
Men at just about the same time as AYLI.  Jaques's railing way of "curing"
Orlando is strongly remininiscent of Jonson's satire (though not, perhaps,
of any particular Jonsonian character, unless it be Macilente), and Jaques's
"cure" strongly contrasts (especially in its ineffectiveness) with Rosalind's,
which is Shakespeare's own invention.
 
John Cox
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marty Jukovsky <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 28 Jan 95 16:01:26
Subject:        1989 Henry V
 
I thought the subscribers to the Shakespeare list might find the following of
interest. it was posted on the Self-Referential Films Mailing List, and I'm
forwarding it on.
 
Martin Jukovsky
Cambridge, Mass.

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************************************************************************
Not sure if this is the proper format - I don't have an essay prepared or
anything and I'm new to this list.  Was wondering if anyone had any comment on
the Prologue to Kenneth Branagh's film of HENRY V, a film which is presented as
a film-within-a- film.  One interesting effect in particular is when the Chorus
leads the audience out of the movie studio in the beginning, through the double
doors, and into the "real" film of HENRY V. As you go through the doors into
blackness, the first thing you see is another door opening in the distance.
This is the door to the conspirators' chamber, obviously, and through a cut,
the audience is admitted into the "conspiracy" of the film (the conspiracy to
put Shakespeare on film??) and doesn't leave the "real" movie until the very
end of the film (via the doors).
 
However, if the audience isn't in the movie studio, and they are not admitted
into the film yet -- where are they?  (Spatially they are standing in a dark
hallway, but one could argue that the hallway isn't "real" until the
conspirators let the audience "in" to the real film...)   If only for a moment,
it would seem the audience has no point of reference for "where" they are --
where they are in relation to the in-studio framing device, or the "real"
movie, that is.  (The only thing in this film that gives the audience a sense
of continuity, in fact, is the music soundtrack, which links everything --
opening credits, framing device, and the "real" movie in between.)
 
There are other self-referential issues in this film and some of Kenneth
Branagh's other films.  Many, many in-jokes and references in DEAD AGAIN --
Branagh's birthday in the newspaper front page, a scene filmed on "Shakespeare
Bridge," a LIFE magazine cover featuring Laurence Olivier in HAMLET (presumably
a retort to talk about Branagh being "the next Olivier,"), Roman Strauss'
prison number reading 25101415 (October 25, 1415, date of the Battle of
Agincourt), for example. Branagh's composer also has appeared in some of the
films (HENRY V and MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING) playing characters who provide
music; he was to appear in FRANKENSTEIN as a band conductor but the scene was
cut from the film.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 30 Jan 1995 21:24:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Summer rare book courses at the University of Virginia
 
Copies of the announcement for this coming summer's sessions of the University
of Virginia's Rare Book School--which will run for five weeks, from the week of
July 10 through the week of August 7--are now available. Several of this year's
courses should interest Renaissance and early modern specialists,
Shakespearians among them, including:
 
                July 10-July 14 (Week 1)
Peter Blayney, "The Company of Stationers to 1637"    ***N.B.***
 
                July 17-July 21 (Week 2)
Terry Belanger, "Book Illustration to 1880" (how did they do it? how can
you tell what it was they did?)
 
                July 24-July 28 (Week 3)
Jeanne Veyrin-Forrer, "Book Production in c16 France"
 
                July 31-August 4 (Week 4)
Donald W. Krummel, "How to Research a Rare Book" (bibliographically, of
course!)
 
                August 7-August 11 (Week 5)
Albert Derolez, "Latin Paleography, 1100-1500"
 
The school will also offer other courses--it offers some 30 courses altogether,
counting repeated courses--especially in the areas of bookbinding history,
papermaking history, early modern typography, electronic texts and uses of the
Internet, and introductory descriptive bibliography, as well as a general
introduction to the history of printed books in Europe and North America.  Some
of these courses, too, may interest people at work in early modern fields (as
well as their students!).
 
This announcement and additional information are available from:  Rare Book
School, University of Virginia, 114 Alderman Library, Charlottesville, VA
22903-2498 (phone 804 924 8824; fax 804 924 8851; e-mail 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 ).
 
Daniel Traister
Department of Special Collections
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
University of Pennsylvania
 

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