1995

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0083. Wednesday, 8 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 7 Feb 1995 09:46:01 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare and science fiction
 
(2)     From:   James Schaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 07 Feb 1995 09:45:35 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0082  Q: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
(3)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, February 8, 1995
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 7 Feb 1995 09:46:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shakespeare and science fiction
 
Paul Franssen seeks "stories linking Shakespeare with Science Fiction." In
addition to the specific story for which he is looking, in the commonly
available *Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction*, he might also want to know
about *Weird Tales from Shakespeare*, ed. Katharine Kerr and Martin H.
Greenberg (New York:  Daw Books, 1994).  This title is in print in the United
States and should be readily available from general or specialist booksellers
with large paperback stocks.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 07 Feb 1995 09:45:35 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0082  Q: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0082  Q: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
To Paul Franssen:
 
F&SF is the Grand Old Man of science fiction (actually, it was founded in the
'30's by one of the Grand Old Men: somebody Campbell, I believe, who first
published people like Asimov and Heinlein.  Somebody out there will know.)  As
one of the original and true examples of "pulp fiction," you're not going to
find it in standard library collections. Your best bets are either (a) a
university library with a strong collection of American popular culture, or (b)
a bookstore that specializes in catering to the fantasy and sci-fi market.
Uncle Hugo's in Minneapolis is a well-known one; perhaps Christine Mack Gordon
could supply you with their phone number and address.  They, or similar stores,
could also put you in contact with clubs whose members collect such things.
 
"Grok," to quote an obscure source.
 
Jim Schaefer
Georgetown University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(202) 687-4478
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, February 8, 1995
Subject:        Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
I've always been fond of Isaac Asimov's "The Mortal Bard" from *Earth Is Room
Enough*.  At my suggestion, Marilyn Schoenbaum included it in her *A
Shakespeare Merriment: An Anthology of Shakespearean Humor*, Garland, 1988.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.