Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: February ::
Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0091.  Thursday, 9 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Wednesday, 08 Feb 1995 09:45:14 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   More S & SF
 
(2)     From:   Wolfgang Hink <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 06:34:16 +0100
        Subj:   Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
(3)     From:   Daniel Traister <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 8 Feb 1995 11:29:11 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare and science fiction:  a follow-up
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James Schaefer <SCHAEFEJ@GUVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Wednesday, 08 Feb 1995 09:45:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        More S & SF
 
Lurking somewhere in the backroom of my memory is an episode of Rod Serling's
"The Twilight Zone" in which Shakespeare is brought to the 20th Century.  Was
this the plot in which he registers for, and fails, a college course in
Shakespeare?  Or do I have that memory entangled with Asimov's or someone
else's short story?
 
Sometime ago we had a thread going about "first times" with Shakespeare.  But
that first time assumed having been hooked earlier on reading itself.  The
reading habit feeds itself, and satiation, as in all habits, promotes a desire
for variety.  My 14 y.o. son has been heavily into Tolkein, SF, and other
alternative realities ever since he could read.  That's how I got started, too.
Others I know got hooked on 19th C novels as teenagers, and that led to other
books, and ....
 
No call to action here, just musing on the strange ways of the Muses.
 
James F. Schaefer Jr.
Georgetown University

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
(202) 687-4478
 
[You appear to be describing the Asimov short story I mentioned yesterday.  At
a faculty Christmas party, a physics professor tells a colleague in English he
has made a time machine and brings people back from the past.  He brought
Socrates, but he could not understand Greek and sent the philosopher back.
Then he mentions that he brought back Shakespeare.  The English professor says,
"You know I teach Shakespeare?"  The physics professor says, "I know, poor
guy." As it turns out, Shakespeare enrolled in the English teacher's course and
failed.  --HMC]
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Wolfgang Hink <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 06:34:16 +0100
Subject:        Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
In my Guide to Literature on the Internet (which I publish monthly in some
Usenet newsgroups) I found the following list:
 
>Shakespeare in Star Trek
>From: 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
  (Marguerite Petersen)
 
I didn't see this list yet, but it may be interesting for the subject
Shakespeare and Science Fiction.
 
Wolfgang Hink
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel Traister <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Wednesday, 8 Feb 1995 11:29:11 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shakespeare and science fiction:  a follow-up
 
As I reread my message replying to the inquiry about a science fiction story
when it appeared on screen today, I thought that it might have sounded a
*little* arrogant ("readily available" indeed!--well, it may *not* be readily
available where the writer resides).  The next message sounded more or less the
same to me, with additional warnings about how, as a "pulp," *F&SF* won't be
held by "ordinary" libraries.  I understand the writer's fear on that
point--but, perhaps surprisingly, it isn't exactly justified:  even *this*
properly be-Ivy-ed library, the one from which I write, holds it; so do our
neighbors in town (Temple has a *real* science fiction collection, quite
noteworthy).  What original inquirer ought to do is to either (1) send an
Interlibrary Loan request through his or her own university library or (2) send
me a private message (
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 ) and I will see what I can do
here.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.