Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: February ::
Re: The Scottish Play
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0099.  Monday, 13 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 17:46:30 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0089  Re: The Scottish Play
 
(2)     From:   John Gardiner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 18:33:39 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0089 Re: The Scottish Play
 
(3)     From:   William Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 09 Feb 1995 23:12:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Macbeth
 
(4)     From:   Julie  Dubiner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 13 Feb 1995 01:08:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: The Scottish Play
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 17:46:30 -0800
Subject: 6.0089  Re: The Scottish Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0089  Re: The Scottish Play
 
I played the bear in A Winter's Tale, and will answer to the question of bad
luck in plays other than Macbeth. It was my first appearance in a Shakespeare
play, and I growled so wonderfully that the audience cried out, "Let him growl
again." At least I hoped that was on their minds. I was to chase Antigonus off
the stage and devour him in the wings. Antigonus defended himself with a piece
of driftwood, and I told the actor to lay on, since I was well-padded and
mounted with a bear's head on top of my own head, and so Antigonus slugged at
me desperately with his driftwood club, and one night broke my finger, and I
had to trade in my manual typewriter for an electric because I was hurting for
many weeks and could not stand the pounding.
 
So there's an example of injury not connected to Macbeth, and there are
hundreds no doubt. But not having that aura of bad luck, they are not
mentioned.
 
However, who can be sure.  One night of a full moon, I was scorning were-wolves
among friends, then drove home and was stopped by a cop for something dumb in
my opinion, a mere sliding stop, and he would not repent his gross misuse of
his power, but gave me a ticket. I took a look at his name badge before we
parted so that I might sic my congressman on him or something.  His name was
Wolf.
 
Kennedy
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Gardiner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 18:33:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0089 Re: The Scottish Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0089 Re: The Scottish Play
 
In the new and very fine film "A Man of No Importance", Albert Finney's
character enngages in a connversation with a fellow thespian in the theater in
which they hope to stage Wilde's "Salome". His assistant cannot remember what
was the Shakespeare play or scene that was cursed, to which Finney replies "you
mean Macbeth". You can guess the fate of their production.
 
Foreshadow through superstition. I love it.
 
By the way, how safe is it to mention the Dreaded Scottish Play on a
Shakespearian listserve? ;)
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 09 Feb 1995 23:12:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Macbeth
 
"Angels and ministers of grace defend us!" According to Frank Kermode, if you
say that line immediately after mentioning MACBETH, you'll be all right.
 
My account has been jammed for some days, and I've missed a good deal of the
MACBETH stuperstition thread. Is all of this commentary a result of Garry
Wills' book and Frank Kermode's review?
 
My students recall a scene from the Black Adder series.
 
Yours, Bill
(
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 )
Department of English
University of Cincinnati 45221-0065
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julie  Dubiner <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 13 Feb 1995 01:08:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        RE: The Scottish Play
 
For those who find superstitions silly, I implore you all to at least not tempt
trouble.
 
When I was an undergraduate, the new theater history professor was directing
_Tartuffe_.  At the first rehearsal he told the cast that superstitions were
bunk, they should all whistle back-stage, turn off the ghost light, and then he
proceeded to run around our little Arena screaming that Scotsman's name.  Well,
by the top of opening night, he had suffered through a mean case of pneumonia
and his wife had left him and taken the children.  By the end of opening night,
his Tartuffe had slipped off the set and broken his ankle.  In what may be
perceived as an unrelated event, a few years later he was denied tenure.
 
So, believe what you will, but please show proper respect.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.