1995

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0106.  Tuesday, 14 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Alice Kroman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Feb 1995 09:49:49 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0101 Re: Hamlet in Winnipeg
 
(2)     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, February 13, 1994
        Subj: Re: SHK 6.0103 Qs: Courses; Metadrama; Globe
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alice Kroman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Feb 1995 09:49:49 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0101 Re: Hamlet in Winnipeg
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0101 Re: Hamlet in Winnipeg
 
To Scott Shepherd:
 
I assure you that you are not alone on your opinions of Keanu Reeve's "talent".
 Although I did not see the Winnipeg Hamlet, I have seen several of his movies
and find his acting positively embarrassing to watch.
 
Alice M. Kroman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, February 13, 1994
Subject: 6.0103 Qs: Courses; Metadrama; Globe
Comment: Re: SHK 6.0103 Qs: Courses; Metadrama; Globe
 
To Bill Godshalk:  As regards teaching multiple texts, I have found it fruitful
to look at a series of acting/directing problems.  How might variant versions
of a given sequence be differently played?  What are the implications for
performance of various cuts and additions?  Steve Urkowitz is one of the great
people in this field, and your students might like to look at his stuff on
multiple texts of Hamlet, M.W.W. R. and J. and his book on Lear.  He is
terrific on implications for performance.  I will immodestly mention my own
article The *King Lear* Quarto in Rehearsal and Performance, *Shakespeare
Quarterly* Autumn, 1986.  Therein, I describe a production based on the 1608
Quarto. Looking seriously and in detail at these early texts is quite
rewarding. On another thread--Fritz Leiber, a great science fiction writer and
the son of a noted Shakespearean actor, often used the plays in his stories. My
favorite is "No Great Magic" title taken from Robert Graves, about an eerie
production of Mcbeth  in which the company, a band of time-wanderers, is
attempting to change history.  The story originally appeared in the December,
1963, Galaxy.
 
Cheers,
David

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