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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: February ::
Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 108. Wednesday, 15 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   David Reinheimer <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Feb 1995 16:59:27 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Star Trek
 
(2)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Feb 1995 22:13:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare and Sci-Fi
 
(3)     From:   Stephen Buhler <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Feb 1995 09:25:57 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   SF Shakespeare and Star Trek
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Reinheimer <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Feb 1995 16:59:27 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Shakespeare and Star Trek
 
Just a note: The Spring issue of _Extrapolations_ is a special issue containing
articles on this topic.  The articles treat the original series, the feature
movies and the Next Generation.
 
Have a good day!
Dave Reinheimer
UCDavis
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Feb 1995 22:13:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shakespeare and Sci-Fi
 
Has any one mentioned Clifford Simak, SHAKESPEARE'S PLANET (1976) and Aldous
Huxley's ISLAND (1962), both of which, as I recall play off of THE TEMPEST.
 
Yours, Bill
 
Subject:        Retraction
 
Having recent said that Huxley's ISLAND plays off of THE TEMPEST, I hasten to
point out that I was not well served by my memory. Although ISLAND may have
some Shakespearean touches, Huxley was obviously updating More's UTOPIA.
 
Yours, Bill
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Buhler <
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Date:           Wednesday, 15 Feb 1995 09:25:57 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        SF Shakespeare and Star Trek
 
In response to the recent thread on Science Fiction and Shakespeare, I'm happy
to let SHAKSPERians know about a special issue of EXTRAPOLATION, the SF and
Fantasy journal.  The issue was organized and guest-edited by Susan C. Hines,
Middle Georgia College.  I have adapted the following from her description of
its contents:
 
There's an editor's column by EXTRAPOLATION editor-in-chief, Donald M. Hassler.
 The Introductory article, "What's Academic About Trek," by Susan C. Hines, is
an argument for cultural/media studies, an explanation of how such an special
issue of EXTRAPOLATION came to be, and an overview of the essays on Shakespeare
and STAR TREK.  The issue includes three essays (by John Pendergast, Stephen M.
Buhler, and Mark Houlahan) on STAR TREK VI: THE UNDISCOVERED COUNTRY.  Each of
these essays has or reflects a particular theoretical slant--one new
historicist, one cultural materialist, one postcolonial--and all deal with
plays such as HAMLET, THE TEMPEST, JULIUS CAESAR, and RICHARD II.  There's one
essay on the CLASSIC TREK by Mary Dutta, a feminist perspective which deals
with episodes CATSPAW, REQUIEM FOR METHUSULA, ELAAN OF TROYIUS, CONSCIENCE OF
THE KING and with plays MACBETH, THE TEMPEST, TAMING OF THE SHREW, and HAMLET).
 And there are also two essays on STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION.  David
Reinheimer's is on moral philosophy and the series' most Shakespearean
nonhumans, Data and Q; Emily Hegarty's is a feminist close reading of an
episode called THE PERFECT MATE and its relationship to Shakespeare's sonnets.
 
I'm told the issue is just out; it's available from the Kent State University
Press.
 
Stephen M. Buhler, Department of English, University of
Nebraska-Lincoln
 

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