Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: February ::
Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0125.  Tuesday, 21 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Charles S. Ross <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 95 09:20:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re:  SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(2)     From:   Nick Clary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 09:52:30 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Romeo and Juliet
 
(3)     From:   Marcia Hepps <hepps@IPFWCVAX.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 11:38:26 EST
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(4)     From:   Dale Lyles <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 11:38:18 -0500
        Subj:   Capulet's fingers
 
(5)     From:   Jean Peterson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 11:54:25 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(6)     From:   Robert S. Cohen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 09:27:49 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0121 Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(7)     From:   David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 12:34 ET
        Subj:   Romeo and Rosaline
 
(8)     From:   Tom Dale Keever <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 95 12:51:40 EST
        Subj:   Capulet's itchy fingers
 
(9)     From:   Jerry Bangham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 21:41:28
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(10)    From:   Frank Savukinas <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 20 Feb 1995 14:49:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   R and J Question
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles S. Ross <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 95 09:20:15 -0500
Subject: 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        Re:  SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
Capulet's fingers itch because he anticipates striking Juliet. This form of
bodily prophecy occurs in Macbeth when one witch predicts the arrival of
Macbeth by the prickin of her thumbs. Similar phenomena occur today: fighters
thumb their noses because itchy noses were thought to indicate a fight; if you
scratch your ear in Ireland today, people will ask you if you think someone is
talking about you. I think there's a note on Capulet's itch in the Variorum.
 
Charles Ross
Purdue Univ.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nick Clary <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 09:52:30 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Romeo and Juliet
 
"I can't say for sure if he would have noticed Juliet if his dance card had
already been filled, but I am pretty sure that  Rosaline wouldn't have been
able to co-improvise a love sonnet with Juliet's aplomb. She's beautiful,she's
funny,  she uses big words, and her name scans better. I don't think Rosaline
ever had a chance."
                    Gail Lerner
 
"My second response, though, was that we already know the answer to the
question: of course he would have fallen in love with Juliet, and abandoned
Rosaline.  How do I know?  Because if you change the names a little, Romeo
becomes Demetrius, Rosaline becomes Helena, and Juliet becomes Hermia."
                   Bradley S. Berens
 
What if you change Romeo's name to Orlando, Rosalind's name to Ganymede,
and then Ganymede's name back to Rosalind?  I don't know which name scans
better, but this Ros is every bit as beautiful, as funny, as able to use big
words as Juliet.  And Orlando?  Well, he's no poet but I kind of like what's
become of him by the end of the play.
 
Nick Clary
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marcia Hepps <hepps@IPFWCVAX.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 11:38:26 EST
Subject: 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
I'm directing the show now and here are my 2 cents worth. I think it is neither
comedy nor tragedy but the most beautiful melodrama ever written.
 
Remembering that Roz was herself a Capulet or else close enough to be invited
to the Capulet party we could still have had the "brawling love" but then the
play but if but but me no buts. I love the trolley car line and who knows. Mont
and Cap each have one child --done deal. And by the way how many kids do the
Scottish couple have (is it taboo to email the name while in production. Sorry
for the ramble I am delirious with fever.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dale Lyles <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 11:38:18 -0500
Subject:        Capulet's fingers
 
According the the high school textbook from which I used *not* to teach R&J,
Capulet's fingers itched because he wanted to slap the ungrateful little
baggage.
 
Dale Lyles
artistic director
Newnan Community Theatre Company
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 11:54:25 -0500
Subject: 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
>When Capulet goes bananas over Juliet's refusal to go for the County Paris, he
>makes the odd statement, "My fingers itch." What are we to make of that?
 
Ha!  Good question.  I've always assumed that he means something like, "My
fingers itch to slap the stubborn wench upside the the head"--or to
otherwise inflict harm--and that's usually how I've seen it played.  Are
there alternative suggestions?
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Robert S. Cohen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 09:27:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0121 Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0121 Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
I played "my fingers itch!" as Capulet's warning Juliet of an impending
spanking: i.e. "I itch to spank you for this!"  But the line is dark and
grisly, and reminds me of Rodney Dangerfield's characterization in *Natural
Born Killers.*   Robert Cohen
 
(7)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 12:34 ET
Subject:        Romeo and Rosaline
 
As Ron Moyer usefully reminds us, speculations about such might-have-beens are
strictly extraterrextual.  But they can be fun.  Seems unlikely to me that R
and J would have got together.  If Rosaline has admitted his suit, he's going
to be obliged to follow up at least for awhile.  Even if he does discover some
disabling difference between the love-image and the love-actual, there'll be a
gap of days or weeks.  In the meantime, Juliet has been betrothed to Paris; he
is, after all, a perfectly presentable young man, and with no marriage to Romeo
to interfere, and no ground on which to recruit Friar Lawrence and his knockout
drops, no way to prevent that wedding from occurring--as keen as both Paris and
Capulet are, within a couple of weeks at most.  The possibility of a subsequent
and adulterous relationship would remain; for whatever reasons, Sh. wasn't
ready to explore that kind of thing for another 10 years or so.
 
Practically,
Dave Evett
 
(8)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tom Dale Keever <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 95 12:51:40 EST
Subject:        Capulet's itchy fingers
 
Ronald Dwelle asks "[W]hat are we to make of [Capulet's line "My fingers
itch]?"  I'm sure there are plausible academic, not to mention dermatological,
glosses, but I can suggest a practical answer.
 
Actors love any text that suggests strong physical expression, especially if it
addresses the perennial problem of what to do with our hands.  When I toured as
Capulet with The National Shakespeare Company I recall lunging at Juliet's
throat with that line, so that my wife and the Nurse had to restrain me.  Other
actors and academics will surely find more restrained interpretations.  I
confess I played the scene completely over the top and enjoyed every moment of
it.
 
(9)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jerry Bangham <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 21:41:28
Subject: 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0121  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
 
>When Capulet goes bananas over Juliet's refusal to go for the County Paris, he
>makes the odd statement, "My fingers itch." What are we to make of that?
 
I'd assume that he was indicating that he was anxious to give her a whipping.
 
(10)---------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Savukinas <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 20 Feb 1995 14:49:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        R and J Question
 
In response to Ronald Dwelle's question concerning Capulet's quote in Act 3,
Scene 5 of "Romeo and Juliet" where he says "My fingers itch," there is a
simple answer to it. The interpretation I take from it is that Capulet's
fingers were itching to hit Juliet. Many people might not imagine this kind of
cruelty from him, but rememeber his terrible temper. In many productions of
this play, the director has Capulet hit Juliet in some form during this scene.
During Zeferelli's production, Capulet pushes Juliet off the bed. I think
Shakespeare was brilliant in giving Capulet such a terrible temper. It adds to
the danger that both Romeo and Juliet face in this relationship.
 
Frank Savukinas

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.