1995

Re: Science Fiction; Homoerotic; Musicals

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0102.  Monday, 13 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   William Russell Mayes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Feb 1995 10:46:32 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0091  Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
(2)     From:   David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 10 Feb 95 09:20:13 SAST-2
        Subj:   The homoerotic
 
(3)     From:   Marty Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 12 Feb 95 02:06:12
        Subj:   Fwd: Musicals based on Shakespeare (was POSSIBLE MUSICALS)
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Russell Mayes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Feb 1995 10:46:32 -0500
Subject: 6.0091  Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0091  Re: Shakespeare and Science Fiction
 
Regarding Shakespeare and Star Trek, there is a ton of the bard in the movies
and throughout the (several) series, though by no means is there a systematic
use of W.S.  Paul Cantor has a paper on Shakespeare in the Star Trek movies.  I
am sure he'd be happy to send it to you (he is at the Dept. of English, Wilson
Hall, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903).  Half jokingly, I
once gave a paper entitled "Historical Criticism: The Next Generation, or Why
Doesn't the Federation have a Cloaking Device?" but the writers of _Star Trek:
The Next Generation_ (the one with Patrick Stewart) ruined it by writing a show
where that question is answered.  Alas.
 
W. Russell Mayes, Jr.
Dept. of English
University of Virginia
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Schalkwyk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Feb 95 09:20:13 SAST-2
Subject:        The homoerotic
 
Is the fact that sonnets addressed by men to _women_ "sound like love letters"
enough to "establish anything definite?"
 
David Schalkwyk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marty Jukovsky <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 12 Feb 95 02:06:12
Subject:        Fwd: Musicals based on Shakespeare (was POSSIBLE MUSICALS)
 
I thought the following would be of interest to SHAKSPER subscribers.  It was
posted on the musical theater mailing list (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).
 
Martin Jukovsky
Cambridge, Mass.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
***********************************
 
Michael Soliven Lara (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) writes:
 
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
On 8 Feb 1995, Adam Feldman wrote:
 
> What does anyone else think? Any other ideas for musicals to come? It might
be interesting to have musicals based on Shakespeare plays. We've already seen
works which either touch on Shakespeare (e.g. Kiss Me Kate) or works which
freely adapt Shakespeare (e.g. Otello, West Side Story). How about Hamlet?
 
Some problems with this include:
 
if there are new lyrics, the lyricist might be accused of tampering with
already perfect verse (such was one reported criticism of the flop Cyrano) if
there aren't new lyrics, the composer would have to find some way of
musicalizing the work without making it monotonous or ridiculous
<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
 
I was in a musical adaptation of Shakespeare's "A Winter's Tale."  It was a
pretty horrible mishmash, partly because of some of the above concerns.  Much
of Shakespeare's beautiful verse was rewritten, some just shortened in the
interest of time, but some because the writer was afraid it would not be
understood -- it got kind of "dumbed-down."
 
I played Paulina, Hermione's chief lady-in-waiting (or something like that --
it's never made exactly clear even in Shakespeare), which was originally a nice
supporting role.  However, I get the idea that Paulina was the writer's
favorite character.  She (the writer, who was also directing) called Paulina
the original feminist, and beefed up the role a whole lot just because it was
her favorite.  I had three solos and three or four duets -- unfortunately, a
lot of the music was awful (a song to Leontes about Hermione's child called
"The Babe is Yours" stands out as particularly bad).
 
A Pippin-like chorus that showed up at the beginning and end of each act was
also added, and Father Time led them -- they were funny but had little or
nothing to do with the story and were not integrated into the play at all.
 
There was one glorious moment: Camillo the faithful servant singing a song
called "I Know an Island" to Florizel and Perdita.  It was a beautiful tenor
ballad almost worth the price of admission by itself.
 
Of course, the original play is problematic -- it starts out as almost a
tragedy, and ends up as a sort of pastoral romance -- but making it a musical
-- at least in this inception -- only exacerbated its problems.
 
I believe this "Musical Winter's Tale" was done once before at Brown
University.  I'd love to hear from anyone who was associated with it or saw it.
 
Also, back in 1981 or 1982 I saw the pre-Broadway production of "Oh, Brother"
at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.  It was an adaptation of "The Comedy
of Errors" (or going further back "The Menaechmi (sp?)) set in Iran.  Parts of
it were wonderful -- I seem to remember Judy Kaye having a beautiful ballad
about one of the brothers.  But parts were incredibly tacky -- there was a
kickline of Arabs (which was actually pretty funny, but probably offensive to
some) and a lot of Ayatollah (or was it Shah?) jokes.  I heard later that it
closed on Broadway after something like three days  -- I wonder if there's any
recording of it out there?
 
Hoping there are better Shakespeare adaptations around ... or being written.
 
Ginny
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Re: Hamlet in Winnipeg

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0101.  Monday, 13 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Scott Shepherd<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 22:20:27 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Keanu Reeves
 
(2)     From:   Paul Stanwood <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 21:08:28 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0095 Re: *Hamlet* in Winnipeg
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 22:20:27 -0500
Subject:        Re: Keanu Reeves
 
Am I the only one who thinks Keanu Reeves is the worst screen actor this side
of Steven Segal? Isn't he indisputably horrible in Branagh's Ado? Is even his
_accent_ endurable in Dracula? I figured in Speed at least he'd be limited to
Schwartzeneggerish oneliners and nonspeaking action sequences, but he honestly
ruined the whole experience for me, every time he opened his mouth or made any
show of emotion.
 
He has one good trick, the one he does in Parenthood, Bill&Ted, River's Edge,
and My Own Private Idaho.
 
But HIM in the role of roles? NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!! I get ulcers reading about
it. Are there no bad reviews of that show? Will somebody post them please oh
please?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Stanwood <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 21:08:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0095 Re: *Hamlet* in Winnipeg
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0095 Re: *Hamlet* in Winnipeg
 
I wonder if this review appeared in the SUNDAY Times magazine?  It is cheap,
stupid, insulting, and condescending, though these are all characteristics of
the Times of London, too, especially when considering anything that occurs
outside of London itself.  Winnipeg IS a long way from Hollywood (one of its
many virtues)!
 
I suppose this silly reviewer meant "Lieutenant-General" for
"Governor-General", though he/she would not know the difference!
 
--Just a first impression of an irritating, though (I suppose) well meaning
review.
 
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Paul Stanwood
English, Univ. of British Columbia
Vancouver, Canada

Re: The Scottish Play

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0099.  Monday, 13 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 17:46:30 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0089  Re: The Scottish Play
 
(2)     From:   John Gardiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 18:33:39 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0089 Re: The Scottish Play
 
(3)     From:   William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 09 Feb 1995 23:12:06 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Macbeth
 
(4)     From:   Julie  Dubiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Feb 1995 01:08:03 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: The Scottish Play
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard J Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 17:46:30 -0800
Subject: 6.0089  Re: The Scottish Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0089  Re: The Scottish Play
 
I played the bear in A Winter's Tale, and will answer to the question of bad
luck in plays other than Macbeth. It was my first appearance in a Shakespeare
play, and I growled so wonderfully that the audience cried out, "Let him growl
again." At least I hoped that was on their minds. I was to chase Antigonus off
the stage and devour him in the wings. Antigonus defended himself with a piece
of driftwood, and I told the actor to lay on, since I was well-padded and
mounted with a bear's head on top of my own head, and so Antigonus slugged at
me desperately with his driftwood club, and one night broke my finger, and I
had to trade in my manual typewriter for an electric because I was hurting for
many weeks and could not stand the pounding.
 
So there's an example of injury not connected to Macbeth, and there are
hundreds no doubt. But not having that aura of bad luck, they are not
mentioned.
 
However, who can be sure.  One night of a full moon, I was scorning were-wolves
among friends, then drove home and was stopped by a cop for something dumb in
my opinion, a mere sliding stop, and he would not repent his gross misuse of
his power, but gave me a ticket. I took a look at his name badge before we
parted so that I might sic my congressman on him or something.  His name was
Wolf.
 
Kennedy
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Gardiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 9 Feb 1995 18:33:39 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0089 Re: The Scottish Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0089 Re: The Scottish Play
 
In the new and very fine film "A Man of No Importance", Albert Finney's
character enngages in a connversation with a fellow thespian in the theater in
which they hope to stage Wilde's "Salome". His assistant cannot remember what
was the Shakespeare play or scene that was cursed, to which Finney replies "you
mean Macbeth". You can guess the fate of their production.
 
Foreshadow through superstition. I love it.
 
By the way, how safe is it to mention the Dreaded Scottish Play on a
Shakespearian listserve? ;)
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 09 Feb 1995 23:12:06 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Macbeth
 
"Angels and ministers of grace defend us!" According to Frank Kermode, if you
say that line immediately after mentioning MACBETH, you'll be all right.
 
My account has been jammed for some days, and I've missed a good deal of the
MACBETH stuperstition thread. Is all of this commentary a result of Garry
Wills' book and Frank Kermode's review?
 
My students recall a scene from the Black Adder series.
 
Yours, Bill
(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Department of English
University of Cincinnati 45221-0065
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julie  Dubiner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Feb 1995 01:08:03 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        RE: The Scottish Play
 
For those who find superstitions silly, I implore you all to at least not tempt
trouble.
 
When I was an undergraduate, the new theater history professor was directing
_Tartuffe_.  At the first rehearsal he told the cast that superstitions were
bunk, they should all whistle back-stage, turn off the ghost light, and then he
proceeded to run around our little Arena screaming that Scotsman's name.  Well,
by the top of opening night, he had suffered through a mean case of pneumonia
and his wife had left him and taken the children.  By the end of opening night,
his Tartuffe had slipped off the set and broken his ankle.  In what may be
perceived as an unrelated event, a few years later he was denied tenure.
 
So, believe what you will, but please show proper respect.

Re: Shylock; Fortinbras

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0100.  Monday, 13 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 09 Feb 1995 22:18:14 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0093  Re: Shylock
 
(2)     From:   Charles Adler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Feb 1995 07:54:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0093  Re: Shylock
 
(3)     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 22:20:17 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Fortinbras
 
(4)     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 22:20:31 -0500
        Subj:   Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 09 Feb 1995 22:18:14 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0093  Re: Shylock
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0093  Re: Shylock
 
David Evett, after very carefully telling us that Shylock is merely a verbal
construct, goes on to tell us that his "text invites this kind of reading."
Note the metaphoric slip that Dave makes. He implies that he has an active text
that invites him to read in a certain way. As we all know, unfortunately, texts
do not read themselves, nor do they invite specific readings. What Dave sees as
an invitation in the text is in reality inside his brain.
 
Yours,  Bad Bill
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Charles Adler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Feb 1995 07:54:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0093  Re: Shylock
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0093  Re: Shylock
 
While I agree that the text leaves little room for an ealier contrivance of
Shylock's bargain, I wonder why one would be less justified in inferring the
history of a dramatic character than a a real live person about whom one has
similar information?
 
Charles Adler
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 22:20:17 -0500
Subject:        Re: Fortinbras
 
David Glassco writes
 
>I wonder if Chris Gordon would elaborate on exactly why or how Hamlet's
>soliloquay "How all occasions do inform against me..." was made so powerful in
>the production she's discussing. I have always been bemused by the fact that
>the occasion Hamlet has just experienced (Fortinbras going off to a pointless
>war) is precisely the sort of occasion that might lead to a recognition of the
>need for further thought _before_ action, rather than encouraging anything
>precipitous.
 
Alexander Smith answers this by defending the character of Fortinbras, which I
think is a side issue. It isn't necessary for us (or Hamlet) to think that
Fortinbras is a good man or that his attack on Poland is justifiable.
 
The point of the pointlessness of Fortinbras' excursion is strategic: intensify
the comparative effect. The same thing happens in "And all for nothing, for
Hecuba!" etc, the common idea being to contrast Hamlet with someone who
responds to his predicament definitively and with vehemence, and to exaggerate
that contrast by giving that person a flimsy excuse for their behavior, while
Hamlet's cause is indisputable: "What would he do had he the motive and the cue
for passion that I have?"; "How stand I then that have a father killed, a
mother stained, excitements of my reason and my blood, and let all sleep while
to my shame I see the imminent death of twenty thousand men who for a fantasy
and trick of fame go to their graves like beds...?"
 
The notion that Hamlet might learn a lesson from Fortinbras along the lines of
"further thought before action" is related to a general mistake about Hamlet,
viz that his procrastination is a matter of being shrewd or of making up his
mind on some sort of moral question--even though he is constantly saying the
opposite of this, notably "I do not know why yet I live to say this thing's to
do, sith I have cause and will and strength and means to do't." Certainly after
the Mousetrap there is no more decision-making to be done, and during the
Fortinbras speech it is unlikely that the audience will think that further
thought is what Hamlet's situation requires.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 12 Feb 1995 22:20:31 -0500
Subject:        Hamlet
 
Continuing this "How all occasions" thread:
 
This part
 
>Rightly to be great
>Is not to stir without great argument
>But greatly to find quarrel in a straw
>When honor's at the stake.
 
has received some interpretive attention as either a corruption or a case of
Shakespeare not quite saying what he meant (not to stir = not to not stir), but
has anybody argued for the meaning as written?
 
I think the question "What is it about Fortinbras' expedition that impresses
Hamlet," more or less raised by Edward Glassco last week, hangs on what you
decide this passage means.
 
My suggestion is that honor = great argument, ie Hamlet's gist is "This attack
on Poland is an act of greatness because it is not a gratuitous display of
military machismo but unflinching commitment to a question of honor."
 
Well?

Conferences: Performance Studies; Medieval/Renaissance

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0098.  Monday, 13 February 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Amanda Barrett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 11 Feb 1995 17:10:51 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Performance Studies conference information: March 23-26
 
(2)     From:   Thomas M. Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 12 Feb 95 14:06:02 EST
        Subj:   CFP: Medieval-Renaissance Conference
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Amanda Barrett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 11 Feb 1995 17:10:51 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Performance Studies conference information: March 23-26
 
          F I R S T  A N N U A L
          PERFORMANCE STUDIES CONFERENCE
          "The Future of the Field"
 
          Thursday March 23-Sunday March 26, 1995
          Department of Performance Studies
          Tisch School of the Arts
          New York Univerity, NY
 
We invite you to attend the First Annual Performance Studies Conference, "The
Future of the Field."  The program will feature over 50 events, including
panels, roundtable discussions, practical workshops, and performances. Over 180
scholars, graduate students, and artists will participate as speakers,
moderators, and performers. In all, our participants will represent over 40
academic or artistic institutions from around the country and abroad. Our
international participants will hail from France, the former Yugoslavia,
Slovenia, Canada, England, Israel, and Australia. The conference will feature
four plenary sessions and seven "breakout" sessions, during which smaller
panels, seminars, and performances will be held concurrently.  Many panels
address interdisciplinary topics and aim to expand and complicate issues in
performance scholarship.  Major areas of inquiry include: new dance
scholarship; theatre research; new technologies and performance studies; queer
performativity and performance; gender in/as performance; reading/writing the
body; race and performance scholarship; and performing new identities.
 
Performances will be held each night. A Kick-Off cabaret will be held on
Thursday night.  The Friday and Saturday night events at a nearby nightclub,
Fez, will feature Yareli Arizmendi, Circus Amok, The Five Lesbian Brothers,
Marianne Goldberg, Dan Hurlin, Guillermo Gomez Pena, La Grand Scena Opera,
Holly Hughes, Salley May, Peggy Pettitt, and Carmelita Tropicana.
 
This conference inaugurates an annual event to be hosted on alternate years by
the departments of Performance Studies at the Tisch School of the Arts and at
Northwestern University. The Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the Society of
Ethnomusicology will hold their annual conference concurrenty on the NYU
campus. The theme of this year's MACSEM conference is "Ethnomusicology and
Performance Studies." The two conferences will co-sponsor a panel, and
registered members of the Performance Studies Conference will be welcome at
selected MACSEM events.
 
Conference events on Friday and Saturday, March 24 & 25, are scheduled from 9am
to 6:30 pm, followed by a reception on Friday and a Dinner on Saturday. On
Sunday, events begin at 9am and end at 2pm. A book fair will be held
throughout the conference.
 
==========================================
 
IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO REGISTER BY E-MAIL.
 
==========================================
 
You may download or copy the following form, or send a letter including your
name, address, phone number, institutional affliliation (if any) and a check
payable to New York University for the appropriate amount (remember to include
both registration and dinner if you choose) to:
 
Jill Lane and Amanda Barrett
Directors, First Annual Performance Studies Confernence
Department of Performance Studies, 6th Floor
721 Broadway
NYU, Tisch School of the Arts
New York, NY 10003
 
Phone: (212) 998-1624
Fax: (212) 995-4960
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------
Performance Studies Conference Registration Form
 
**Early registration:  postmarked by February 21
          [   ] $35      [   ] Students $15
 
    Registration after February 21
          [   ] $40      [   ] Students $20
 
           (On-sight registration:
        Students $50; students $30)
 
**Special dinner Saturday March 25  in the spectacular
    Snow Dining Room: Don't miss it:  great views, open bar,
    and a chance to get to know your colleagues!
     (Dinner reservations must be made by March 5, 1995.)
          [   ] $30
 
          [ _______ ] TOTAL
 
Name:
Address:
Phone number:
Institutional affliliation (if any):
E-Mail address:
-------------------------------------------------------------
 
Hotel information:
 
We recommend that you make your reservation at one of the
following hotels as soon as possible:
 
The Washington Square Hotel
103 Waverly Place.  Reservations: (212) 777-9515
European-style hotel on Washington Square.  Double bed, $120;
2 twin beds or 1 queen sized bed, $120; quad (2 doubles)
$142.  Includes continental breakfast.
 
The Grammercy Park Hotel
2 Lexington Avenue at 21st Street.
Reservations: 1-800-221-4083
Overlooks Gramercy Square Park.  Rates range from $125-$140
per night.
 
The Carlton Arms Hotel
160 East 25th Street.  Reservations: (212) 679-0680
Funky student-style accommodations, a bit of a walk from NYU.
Rates: single $40-$50; double $50-60; triple $75.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas M. Costa <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 12 Feb 95 14:06:02 EST
Subject:        CFP: Medieval-Renaissance Conference
 
 CALL FOR PAPERS
 
 MEDIEVAL-RENAISSANCE CONFERENCE IX
 
 SEPT. 28-30, 1995
 
 CLINCH VALLEY COLLEGE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA
 
 KEYNOTE ADDRESS: KELLY DEVRIES OF LOYOLA COLLEGE, BALTIMORE,
 
        "LEGENDS OF THE MIDDLE AGES"
 
 Submissions on all topics of interest to Medieval and
 Renaissance scholars, including history, philosophy,
 literature, art, and music, are welcome.
 
 Please submit a brief abstract accompanied by a one-page vita
 by June 1 to:
 
        Tom Costa
        Dept. of History and Philosophy
        Clinch Valley College
        Wise, Va. 24293
        (703)328-0231
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
 For further information, please contact
 
 Dr. Tom Costa                           Dept. of History and Philosophy
 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.                        Clinch Valley College, Wise, Va. 24293
 (703)328-0231

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