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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: January ::
Re: C-H CD-ROM; Books; Dreams
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0004. Wednesday, 4 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Douglas M Lanier <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Jan 1995 15:48:26 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Shakespeare on CD-ROM
 
(2)     From:   Paul Stanwood <
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        Date:   Monday, 2 Jan 1995 16:31:28 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.1031 Re: Books
 
(3)     From:   E. L. Epstein <epstein@QCVAXA.BITNET>
        Date:   Monday, 02 Jan 1995 20:49:14 EDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0001  Re: Dreams
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <
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Date:           Monday, 2 Jan 1995 15:48:26 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Shakespeare on CD-ROM
 
I too was intrigued by Chadwyck-Healey's CD-ROM Shakespeare collection, and
also wondered why it was so very expensive.  Certainly at a whopping $4000 for
one disk only a handful of institutions could afford it. Might we SHAKSPERians
initiate a writing campaign to encourage CH to reconsider their prices, at
least to individuals?  We are, after all, the natural market for this product.
The address I received with their flyer is:
        Chadwyck-Healey, Inc.
        1101 King Street, Suite 380
        Alexandria, VA  22314-9455
E-mail can be sent to 
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 .  I'm not hopeful, but it's worth a
shot.
 
Cheers,
Douglas Lanier

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Stanwood <
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 >
Date:           Monday, 2 Jan 1995 16:31:28 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 5.1031 Re: Books
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.1031 Re: Books
 
Re:  OP Books -- Try Moe's Books in Berkeley, CA  Their e-mail address is
<
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 >  If they don't have the book you want in stock, they will
advertise for it.  There is a nominal charge.
        Paul Stanwood
<
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 >
English, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. L. Epstein <epstein@QCVAXA.BITNET>
Date:           Monday, 02 Jan 1995 20:49:14 EDT
Subject: 6.0001  Re: Dreams
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0001  Re: Dreams
 
Regarding poetic language--English poetry is written in English, and is bound
by the complete rules of English. Rather than say that poetry is a kind of
*word stew* with a lot of nouns and verbs and adjectives floating around in a
fuzzy sauce called POETRY, it would make a lot more sense, and correspond more
to the realities of poetic creation, if we realized that poetry uses all of the
resources of the language, much more than prose or other forms do. A poet is
someone in whom the language is so internalized that it leaps to the poet's
command on an occasion when something has excited the poet. We can, in fact
must, analyze poetry if we are to understand language at all, since poetry is
language at its full stretch. Are we to say that we love Shakespeare but we
couldn't be bothered with what he meant? I think not. It is very tempting to
take a vacation from sense, and unbuckle your mind and competence to speak and
understand English when reading poetry, but this is only lukewarm and indolent
Romanticism, with which the real Romantics would hav no traffic. It is not too
much to say that a great poet is someone who knows how to use the little words
that are the backbone of the English language, not someone who picks out a few
lexical rhinestone and puts them in a plastic bath. Therefore it *does* make a
difference how Shakespeare used *of* and *on*! E.L.Epstein
 

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