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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: January ::
Re: Yiddish *MV*s; Wilson's *Sh*; Inconsistencies;
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0041. Saturday, 21 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.BITNET>
        Date:   Friday, 20 Jan 1995 10:32:26 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   *MV* in the Yiddish Theater
 
(2)     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Friday, 20 Jan 1995 11:11:17 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Ian Wilson: "Shakespeare: the Evidence"
 
(3)     From:   Matthew Westcott Smith <
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        Date:   Friday, 20 Jan 1995 22:19:31 GMTST
        Subj:   Tornberg's Query
 
(4)     From:   Anna Joell Goodman <
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        Date:   Friday, 20 Jan 1995 23:56:11 -400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0037  Re: *MV* Spinoffs
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.BITNET>
Date:           Friday, 20 Jan 1995 10:32:26 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        *MV* in the Yiddish Theater
 
My friend Tony Burton, who lives in Amherst, MA, the site of the YIVO archives,
writes that YIVO has four Yiddish translations of *MV.*  It would be
fascinating to see what they make of the play.  Tony Burton also points out
that Leonard Prager wrote a long article with long appendix called "Shakespeare
in Yiddish," SQ (spring 1968), which mentions a number of Yiddish versions of
*MV*.  I have not yet read that article but it seems an appropriate place to
begin when considering the play's anti-Semitism: that is, what do these
translators have to remove, what do they have to change, in order to make
Shylock sympathetic?
 
Yours,
Bernice
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Friday, 20 Jan 1995 11:11:17 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Ian Wilson: "Shakespeare: the Evidence"
 
I just ran across a "new" book by Ian Wilson called "Shakespeare: the
Evidence." In the mold of his book about Jesus, Wilson seems to have taken a
kind of journalistic approach to writing a biography of Shakespeare:
recognizing that he isn't an authority himself, he's interviewed a lot of
people who are. The title might lead one to think he's wading into the
authorship controversy, but apparently that's only a small part of the book. I
call it a "new" book because it was copyright 1993, and was apparently
published in Great Britain then -- only now being made available in the U.S.
 
Has anyone seen or read this one? It appears to be pretty well up-to-date,
especially on the subject of John Shakespeare. Wilson is an absorbing writer
but not always reliable in his conclusions.
 
     Tad Davis
     
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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Westcott Smith <
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Date:           Friday, 20 Jan 1995 22:19:31 GMTST
Subject:        Tornberg's Query
 
Mr. Tornberg:
 
You comments regarding Shakespeare's "blatant disregard for accurate research"
are, to say the least, puzzling. Shakespeare--indeed any poet--is not a
theologian nor a historian when writing poetry. This does not mean that
omissions, restatements, and/or misrepresentations are not important and
significant for understanding the Shakespearean corpus; of course they are.
Indeed, it is precisely through the selection of certain necessarily limited
aspects of human life and experience that the poet distinguishes himself from
other thinkers. To my mind, this is especially the case with Hall and Holinshed
in the History plays--which are just that *dramas* based on historical events.
I think if one read them as particularly accessible or pleasant historical
narratives simply, their penetrating insight to the nature of human (hence
political) life is likely to be missed.
 
I am not prepared to comment on Jacob and Laban matter at any length, but I
would suggest that the way the dramatist distorts the relevant OT passages is
just as significant as its presence in the first place.
 
Matthew Westcott Smith, PhD
Lecturer of Political Philosophy
Kossuth University, Debrecen Hungary
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Joell Goodman <
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Date:           Friday, 20 Jan 1995 23:56:11 -400
Subject: 6.0037  Re: *MV* Spinoffs
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0037  Re: *MV* Spinoffs
 
In reponse to the question posed regarding the film "My Own Private Idaho",
with the Keanu Reeves and the late River Phoenix:
 
It was actually a modern-day take on *Henry IV, Part I*, not *MV*.  It was
reasonably well-acclaimed when it came out in the late 80's.  In it, Phoenix
plays a narcoleptic male prostitute, and Reeves is the Hal-esque young man
running away from his political- figure father.  Unfortunately, I have not been
able to see this one, but several of my friends assure me that it is worth a
look.
 
--Anna Joell Goodman
 
[Again, the DATABASE function will enable anyone interested in previous
discussions of *My Own Private Idaho* to locate and retrieve them. --HMC]
 

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