Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: January ::
Re: *Idaho*; Wilson's *Sh.*; New Globe
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0048.  Tuesday, 24 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Thomas Berger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 23 Jan 95 14:03:55 EST
        Subj:   *Idaho*
 
(2)     From:   David Joseph Kathman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 23 Jan 1995 16:12:43 -0600
        Subj:   *Shakespeare: The Evidence*
 
(3)     From:   Andrew Gurr <<
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >>
        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Jan 1995 10:14:01 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Re: The Rebuilding Globe.
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Thomas Berger <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 23 Jan 95 14:03:55 EST
Subject:        *Idaho*
 
In response to
 
Robert Lloyd Neblett on *MY OWN PRIVATE IDAHO*; yes, there are some really bad
parts, too be sure, but the narcoleptic role (and its treatment by the film and
by River Phoenix, who acts it) is the best essay on Poins I have ever "read."
 
Tom Berger
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Joseph Kathman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 23 Jan 1995 16:12:43 -0600
Subject:        *Shakespeare: The Evidence*
 
With regard to Tad Davis' query on Ian Wilson's book *Shakespeare: The
Evidence*:  I just finished reading this a couple of weeks ago, and I can't say
I was all that impressed.  I, too, was led by the title to think he would deal
with anti-Stratfordian claims, but his one chapter on that consists mainly of a
brief summary of Baconian, Oxfordian, Derbyite, etc. claims, all of which he
dismisses without any actual arguments to speak of. The book as a whole is
basically just a biography of Shakespeare, with the underlying purpose (more or
less explicitly stated in the preface) of arguing that Shakespeare was a closet
Catholic.  Thus, he dwells on John Shakespeare's Testament of Faith, but as far
as I remember he doesn't say anything that isn't in Schoenbaum's *Documentary
Life*; he also dwells on the Catholic connections of Ferdinando Stanley (Wilson
assumes, a little too easily for me, that Shakespeare started out as a member
of Strange's Men) and the Earl of Southampton.  The level of scholarship is,
I'm afraid, nothing special; by his own admission, Wilson seems to have relied
mainly on the biographies of A. L. Rowse and Samuel Schoenbaum, and while these
are both fine scholars, there were many times when some variation would have
been helpful.  Wilson's admiration of Rowse, and his concomitant subtle digs at
Schoenbaum, are almost embarrassing at times; his chapter on the sonnets
consists mainly of a summary of Rowse's positions on the identity of the Fair
Youth (Southampton), the Dark Lady (Emilia Bassano-Lanier), and the Rival Poet
(Marlowe), interspersed with approving comments and a rather patronizing swipe
at Schoenbaum's agnosticism in this area.  There are a few morsels in the book,
such as some new (as far as I know) information about John Heminges' connection
with the Company of Grocers, but there are also lacunae (Wilson's summary of
the Elizabethan theatre scene makes no mention of the Boar's Head playhouse,
for instance).  I wanted to like this book more than I did; it's not a bad
summary of a lot of issues, but it's rather one-sided as well, and Wilson's
prose style is not particularly to my liking.
 
That's my two cents; I'd be interested to hear other opinions.
 
Dave Kathman

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Andrew Gurr <<
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >>
Date:           Tuesday, 24 Jan 1995 10:14:01 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Re: The Rebuilding Globe.
 
I can add a few points to Joe Nathan's account of the New Globe. That, by the
way, seems to be the current title. Southwark Borough Council has re-named
Emerson Street at "New Globe Walk", and the name is apt enough to stick.
 
His comment on the wooden trough with stones in it puzzles me. I didn't think
any such thing had been found, though at the Rose in 1989 they found a long
rectangular wooden trough that seems to have been a drain, leading down from
the tiring house out north to the ditch there. There are refs about
stone-rolling in troughs from the time, but I doubt if this discovery was one
of that kind.
 
The yard at the New Globe is at present about fifteen inches lower than it will
eventually be. There's a black line around the inner gallery walls that marks
the eventual level. Like the Rose's yard, it's sloped for drainage, and will
eventually have a deposit on it not unlike the Rose's permeable layer of ash,
clinker and hazel-nut shells. This, it is thought, was 'industrial debris' from
the local soap-making factories, laid to give a standing surface through which
the rainwater would drain itself. As for the hazel-nut shells as audience
debris, when a test was done on some of the Rose remains to see how permeable
it was, they found a few cherry-stones, which can't have come from the soap
factory. So we needn't abandon the idea that the yard surface was pure and
unsullied road-surfacing entirely.
 
Readers with memories of previous kinds of social combat might also enjoy the
news that the stage and tiring-house structure is being put up in a hangar at
the Greenham Common air base.
 
Please note also, as in my previous piece, that there's a conference to discuss
what academic benefit might be gained from proper use of the Globe stage once
it's in use: what kinds of experiment can it best bear? If you can't come to
the conference (on 18-20 April at the Globe: for information fax Alastair
Tallon, Globe Education, London, 0171-928-7968), then please send me your
ideas.
 
Andrew Gurr.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.