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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: January ::
Re: "Globe"; Electronic Riverside; *MV*'s Act Five
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 051. Wednesday, 25 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Terence Hawkes <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Jan 1995 18:25:16 GMT
        Subj:   The Globe project
 
(2)     From:   Don Foster <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 24 Jan 1995 11:13:12 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0027  Q: Copyright and Commentary
 
(3)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 25 Jan 1995 01:01:08 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0046 Re: *MV*: Act Five
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Jan 1995 18:25:16 GMT
Subject:        The Globe project
 
Perhaps Paul Nelsen is unaware that what he describes as simply 'a careful
effort to build an Elizabethan style public playhouse incorporating as many
authentic elements as possible' is in fact being forcefully marketed as
'Shakespeare's Globe'. The pamphlet offering to arrange for the inscription of
your name on the flagstones outside (at 300 quid a go) promises that 'Your Name
Goes Down In History next To Shakespeare's Globe'.  It adds that 'The
Shakespeare Globe Theatre is being RECONSTRUCTED in London . . .'
 
Terence Hawkes
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Foster <
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Date:           Tuesday, 24 Jan 1995 11:13:12 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 6.0027  Q: Copyright and Commentary
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0027  Q: Copyright and Commentary
 
Dear Stan Beeler:
 
For the past several years I've been using ETC Word Cruncher (an electronic
text of the Riverside Shakespeare, ed., G.B.Evans, et.al.). Word Cruncher
is based on the BYU Concordance program, and it has some limitations, but
you might want to have a look at it.  Don Foster (Vassar College)
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Wednesday, 25 Jan 1995 01:01:08 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0046 Re: *MV*: Act Five
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0046 Re: *MV*: Act Five
 
Hi.
 
On the question of *Merchant*'s Act V being anticlimactic, a few recent
critical movements seem to point towards a possible solution.  On one hand,
queerists have pointed to the intensity of the Antonio-Bassanio relationship,
and the need to marginalize Antonio.  Portia forces Bassanio to make an
absolute choice between her and Antonio, using the ring.  In Belmont in Act V,
in what could be a very tempestuous scene of lust turned to aggression, Antonio
is alienated from the central conflict.  Finally, his love for Bassanio is
turned on itself when he becomes honour-bound for Bassanio's faithfulness
towards Portia, and hence Bassanio's rejection of himself.
 
Similarly, some Marxists (I think) have suggested that the merchant is an
outsider within the aristocratic society, to which he hopes to ingratiate
himself by his largesse.  Portia's "Which is the merchant here, and which the
Jew?" seems relevant.
 
Suffice to say that the rejection of the bourgeois merchant by the decadent
aristocrats, or the rejection of the queer by the hetero could both be played
with a similar emotional power to that of the rejection of the Jew by the
Christian.  Moreover, the tragedy of Shylock's fate would be amplified into
more than an individual fall.  It would be shown as a rejection of commerce
itself, or as the triumph of a bigotry that soon extends to all forms of
otherness.
 
Cheerio,
        Sean.
 

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