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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: January ::
QE1 Novel; Greek Tragedy
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0056. Saturday, 28 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Raymond Crispin <
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        Date:   Friday, 27 Jan 1995 11:59:53 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   New Elizabeth I book
 
(2)     From:   Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
        Date:   Saturday, 28 Jan 95 08:39:36 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0030  Re: Greek (Athenian) Tragedy
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Raymond Crispin <
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Date:           Friday, 27 Jan 1995 11:59:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        New Elizabeth I book
 
I just finished reading _I, Elizabeth_ by Rosalind Miles and would like to
recommend it for anyone interested in the life of Elizabeth I. Although this is
a novel which reads like an autobiography, the material was carefully
researched by Ms. Miles who is a serious historian, and the book carefully
follows the life of the queen and her court.  For anyone looking for a readable
biography, this would be a good choice.  And, yes, Shakespeare is not ignored.
Toward the end Elizabeth rages against the Lord Chamerlain's men and "their
hack Shakespeare--he took my shilling.... I am Richard II, know you not that?"
 
Cheers,
Brenda Crispin
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steve Urkowitz <SURCC@CUNYVM>
Date:           Saturday, 28 Jan 95 08:39:36 EST
Subject: 6.0030  Re: Greek (Athenian) Tragedy
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0030  Re: Greek (Athenian) Tragedy
 
Sorry for the delay in getting in this comment on edible Thebans and
condescending Athenians . . . but here goes:
 
I'd like to point out that the apotheosis of Oedipus at the end of the Colonus
play isn't the end of the action.  Yes, the Chorus says nice things about him,
okay.  But then Antigone, swelled up with the godliness of it all, says, "Hey,
I'm now going off to end the strife between my brothers" or words to that
effect.  The effect has to be something like ending a movie about a romantic
pursuit with the couple sailing off on the honeymoon cruise on the Titanic.
 
Seems to be a lot of condescension by we moderns.
 
G'morning gracie.
                 Urk
 

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