1995

Re: Revenge; Globe; Boy Actors (Homoeroticism);

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0040. Friday, 20 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 17:09:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 5.1026 Qs: Revenge
 
(2)     From:   Joe Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 18:39:06 -0800
        Subj:   London Globe Theatre
 
(3)     From:   Catherine Kozubei <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 21:57:42 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Homoeroticism in Shakespeare
 
(4)     From:   E. L. Epstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 20 Jan 1995 00:09:55 EDT
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0034  Re: Greek (Athenian) Tragedy
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Harry Keyishian <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 17:09:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 5.1026 Qs: Revenge
Comment:        Re: SHK 5.1026 Qs: Revenge
 
I can't resist answering Bill Godshalk's query of 26 December about revenge by
touting my book The Shapes of Revenge:  Victimization, Vengeance, and
Vindictiveness in Shakespeare, published this month by Humanities Press.  It
deals with the psychology of revenge, as derived from Renaissance books on the
passions, and treats revenge as a reaction to victimization.
 
Revenge is a species of punishment and serves the similar ends of retribution,
deterrence, and rehabilitation of offenders, though in different order of
priority than punishments in criminal law.  Revenge consists of a harmful act
performed by an individual in response to a malicious injury.  The "malicious"
part is important:  for the revenge to be authentic, the injury must be
intentional and must do psychic as well as physical harm.  Victims of malicious
injury feel diminished, demeaned, violated;  they retaliate to restore
selfhood, vindicate justice, and deter further harm.  Avengers act on behalf of
victims, out of indignation, though they may, like Hamlet, develop their own
cause for revenge in process.
 
Shakespeare deals with the destructive effects of victimization:  Ophelia and
Lear go mad;  the Duchess of Gloucester, unavenged, pines away and dies.
Genuine revenge can regenerate the revenger, as it does Macduff and Edgar, who
also vindicate justice and redeem the state.  Their are many successful comic
revengers, including the wives of Windsor (clearly revenge is not "gendered
male.")
 
Vindictiveness is the evil twin of revenge:  subjectively, it feels the
same--Richard III and Iago perceive themselves as aggrieved persons--but
Shakespeare (and Webster and Chapman, et al.) invited us to see it as a
personality flaw, based on envy and false pride, traits that endow characters
with a grudge against all those who are more successful, happier, or fulfilled
than they.  The most interesting are the mixed cases:  Hamlet and Othello, in
differing ways, slide fatally into vindictiveness at crucial moments.
 
As to whether revenge is tied to an ideology:  certainly it reflects
individualism, as the injured party assumes the rights of the sovereign to feel
outrage, to judge, and to punish (cf. Foucault on punishment). The spectator is
invited to follow the arc of action and become similarly empowered through
sympathy with a just revenge.
 
Harry Keyishian, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. Madison NJ 07940
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joe Nathan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 18:39:06 -0800
Subject:        London Globe Theatre
 
Several people asked me for more info on my recent visit to the restoration of
the Globe Theatre in London.  I did indeed prepare that info and tried to send
it to SHAKSPER as an attachment.  Evidently it didn't work, so here is another
attempt.
 
1) Restoration progress: The restoration itself is well along.  The stalls are
up, the thatched roof is being completed.  The "groundling area" is finished.
The stage is blocked out, and may very well be under construction right now.
The area above the stage (for lifting scenery, producing deus ex machina
effects, etc.) is completed, and the area below the stage (for trap doors,
rising ghosts, etc.) is pretty well finished also.  All this is done using
authentic clay brick, green English oak, thatch, and lime plaster.  A real
labor of love. They are planning on a grand opening in 1995 with the Queen
attending! In addition, work is planned for restoring the surrounding area.
There are several other period buildings and of course the Swan Theatre is not
too far away.
 
2)  Some interesting findings:  They discovered a curving wooden chute which
ran from well above the stage to well below, and it contained rounded boulders.
 They have deduced that rolling boulders from top to bottom produced sounds of
thunder, cannon, etc.  Clever. It was also determined that the "groundling
area" which is shaped like a dish was also pitched in such a way that the
outside perimiter was 8" higher than the center.  This allowed water to drain
to the center where there was a drain, and also helped the groundlings in the
back look over the heads of those in front.
 
3)  The visit:  Highly recommended.  The guides are excellent - knowledgeable,
charming, and excited about the project.  They have a video which is pretty
good and shows the beginning of the concept with Sam Wannamaker.  There are
also booklets, brochures, etc.
 
4)  For more info:  Contact The Globe Tourism Office, Shakespeare's Globe, New
Globe Walk, Bankside, London, SE1 9EB.  Telephone is 071 928 6406.  Fax is 071
928 7968.
 
5)  Donations are welcomed.  We became a "Friend of the Globe" and "bought" a
brick while we were there for 10 pounds sterling. It is also possible to have
your name included on one of the flagstones and you will receive a map showing
where your flagstone is located.  If interested in helping out here are the USA
and Canadian offices:  Shakespeare Globe Centre (USA)Inc., 20 No Michigan Ave,
Suite 400, Chicago, IL 60602, and Shakespeare Globe Centre of Canada, 212 King
St West, Sixth Floor, Toronto, Canada, M5H 1K5.  If you do become a friend, you
will receive mailings, and bulletins which will keep you up to date, and forms
to write for tickets when they open.
 
Hope this is helpful.
Joseph Nathan
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Catherine Kozubei <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 21:57:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Homoeroticism in Shakespeare
 
[Catherine Kozubei shared SHK 6.0021 Re: Boy Actors with Bruce Smith, who
asked that his response be sent to the members.  --HMC]
 
Concerning boy actors and homoeroticism, you might want to pass along the title
of my book, since it does take a middle position, suggesting that boy actors
COULD play for homoerotic appeal in certain genres, in certain circumstances.
I conservatively would limit those circumstances to comedy, and to situations
in which the script specifically calls attention to the boy's body beneath the
female costume--usually when a boy actor is disguised as a girl disguised as a
boy.  Anyhow, the book is called "Homosexual Desire in Shakespeare's England:
A Cultural Poetics" and has just come out in paperback from University of
Chicago Press.  There is also a solid new book on the subject of cross-dressing
by Michael Shapiro:  "Gender in Play on the Shakespearean Stage," just out from
University of Michigan Press.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           E. L. Epstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 20 Jan 1995 00:09:55 EDT
Subject: 6.0034  Re: Greek (Athenian) Tragedy
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0034  Re: Greek (Athenian) Tragedy
 
You are right about Euripides; he is the odd man out of the tragedians. He
seems to have been unpopular with conservatives, who would rather that Athens
got a good press from everybody!  E.L.Epstein

Re: Keanu's Hamlet

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0039. Friday, 20 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 11:13:12 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0031  Re: Keanu's Hamlet
 
(2)     From:   Dave Collins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 14:45:04 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0031  Re: Keanu's Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Henerson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 11:13:12 -0500
Subject: 6.0031  Re: Keanu's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0031  Re: Keanu's Hamlet
 
Dear Chris Gordon,
 
Please post the reviews of the Keanu Reeves' *Hamlet* as well as your own
impressions.  There's a doctoral thesis out there for somebody on the
production and reception of film-and-television star-powered Shakespeare. If
Reeves' experience with Hamlet is anything like Richard Chamberlain's with the
same role in the early '70's, there will be some who condemn both his
performance and his hubris out of hand because of the kinds of films with which
he made his reputation, and there will be others whose admiration of his
courage will completely color their assesment of his work.  I live too far away
to see Reeves, and I am curious not only about what he will do, but about how
people will respond.
 
On the subject of *Hamlet*, I am playing Horatio in a production at the San
Diego Rep which runs from 1/28 - 2/19, and I'd like to post an inquiry on
behalf of our Ophelia.  Does anybody know of a book or article which talks
about a clinical diagnosis of Ophelia's madness?  Anybody with an answer can
post to the list or to me personally.
 
Thanks for the help,
Matt Henerson
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dave Collins <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 14:45:04 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 6.0031  Re: Keanu's Hamlet
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0031  Re: Keanu's Hamlet
 
For Chris Gordon--
 
There's at least one soul out here who would like to see the reviews of Keanu
Reeves's performance in *Hamlet.*  And I'd like to hear your own review as
well.  Send them along!
 
                        Thanks,
                                Dave Collins
                                Westminster College
                                Fulton, MO

Re: *MV*, Especially Act V

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0037. Friday, 20 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Suba Subbaro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday,  19 Jan 95 07:55:46 EST
        Subj:   MV Spinoffs
 
(2)     From:   Stephen Schultz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 95 11:27:25 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0033  Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
(3)     From:   Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 11:51:34 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies
 
(4)     From:   Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 13:14:51 +0001 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
(5)     From:   Louis Scheeder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 14:44:37 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
(6)     From:   Daniel M Larner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 17:24:43 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Suba Subbaro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday,  19 Jan 95 07:55:46 EST
Subject:        MV Spinoffs
 
Pardon me if these questions have been asked before--I am a relative newcomer
to this list.  Is Arnold Wesker's "Merchant" a MV spinoff?  Also, I've heard
that the cult movie, "My Own Private Idaho" is loosely based on MV.  Is it?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen Schultz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 95 11:27:25 EST
Subject: 6.0033  Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0033  Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
On ways to handle Act V of _MofV_:  One of Irving's biographers says that Sir
Henry regularly cut the fifth act as anticlimactic.  When some critic had the
temerity to attack this excision, Irving restored the act in a spirit of
experiment.  But he excised it again upon discovering that it (added onto the
pauses for scene changes at the Lyceum) made the play so long that audience
members couldn't catch public transportation after the show.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 11:51:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies
 
John Owen has a point--yet one of my favorite idiosyncrasies of Act 5 is that
the "charming duet" between Jessica and Lorenzo that begins the act invokes
famous examples of romantic disasters...Troilus and Cressida, Pyramus and
Thisbe, Dido and Aneas...and finally, Medea and Jason! That the Medea reference
is used to segue into Jessica and Lorenzo's tale is maybe telling--another
betrayal of a father, rejection of home and "nation," infatuated elopement,
ending in romantic treachery, rejection, loss, bitterness, and grief...
 
I am teaching this play for the first time next week--so this discussion is
proving both provocative and timely!
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Ostovich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 13:14:51 +0001 (EST)
Subject: 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
Re John Owen's remarks on the "happy ending" of Jessica's romance:  why is it
inconceivable that Jessica might be happy with her Lorenzo, and that she might
at the same time register the fact that no one else (except for Launcelot)
finds her worth talking to?  Wouldn't that muddy the happiness of her marriage,
to find that marriage to a Christian doesn't make her acceptable to other
Christians, and that perhaps revange on her father is not as sweet as she
thought it might be, when only she was the revenger? The kind of revenge that
the others are enjoying might simply remind her of her own Jewishness, her own
otherness, and might well make her as melancholy as Antonio.
 
Helen Ostovich
McMaster University
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Louis Scheeder <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 14:44:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
Re:  John Owen's comment that in the final act of MV, wherein Jessica and
Lorenzo "tease and joke in a familiar way", I would suggest that such a way is
not the only way the scene can be played.  It can also be played for great
conflict - as a real fight.  He has married her for the money, and now the
money's gone.  They seem to be living on Portia's largess, and the servants
don't seem to much like Jessica.  Life is not what they thought it might be.
 
Louis Scheeder
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Daniel M Larner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 17:24:43 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0033 Re: *MV*: Inconsistencies and Miller's
 
I think John Owen misses the point of the isolated Jessica at the end of
Jonathan Miller's MV.  She has stopped, on her way to bed with Lorenzo (with
whom she has just been flirting and teasing), seeing in her hand the judgment
on Shylock awarding her his forfeit properties.  The irony and pain of this
moment, and of her discovery that she will prosper on the back of her father's
loss, is intensified by (not inconsistent with) the teasing scene with Lorenzo.
 I found this a brilliant directorial move, and a terribly moving movement
which pierced the smug self-satisfaction of the play's ending in a way that
seemed appropriate and contained within it.
 
When I saw it at the Old Vic, the intensity of the experience was doubled
because Olivier was ill and had announced his retirement.  This was one of his
last performances, and everyone was hoping for him, praying for him, as if (who
knew?) there were a real chance he might die in the middle of the performance.
His manic energy as Shylock, coupled with his apparent (and rumored)
decrepitude, made his performance look like something of a miracle, which his
very alive appearance for many curtain calls confirmed.
 
Daniel Larner
Fairhaven College
Western Washington University

Sh Yearbook; Cahiers Elisabethains; Ben Jonson Journal

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0038. Friday, 20 January, 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Holger Klein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 14 Jan 1995 17:11:00 +0100
        Subj:   [Shakespeare Yearbook]
 
(2)     From:   Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 95 17:25:21 +0100
        Subj:   Cahiers Elisabethains
 
(3)     From:   David Phillips <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 12:27:59 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Ben Jonson Journal
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Holger Klein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 14 Jan 1995 17:11:00 +0100
Subject:        [Shakespeare Yearbook]
 
"Beginning with Vol. 4 (1993), the Shakespeare Yearbook has been edited by
Holger Klein (Salzburg), with Nicholas Radel (Furman) as Reviews Editor.Members
of the Editorial Board are: Dimiter Daphinoff (Fribourg), Peter Davidazi
(Budapest), James Harner (Texas A&M), Joan Hartwig (Lexington), Andre Lorant
(Paris), Peter Milward (Tokyo), Simon Williams (Santa Barbara)and Rowland Wymer
(Hull).
 
In an attempt to complement the emphases of other journals, the Shakespeare
Yearbook concentrates on four aspects: theatre-oriented
studies,interdisciplinary studies, comparative studies, and the reception of
Shakespeare in a specific country or region. Contributions (up to 25 pages, MLA
style, MS-DOS Word for Windows 6 for IBM, plus hard copy)are double-read.
 
Contributions are being invited to Vol. 6 (1995) "SHAKESPEARE AND HISTORY".
This was originally entitled: Shakespeare, the Tudor Myth, and Modern
Historiography, but it has turned out that interesting articles were also
forthcoming for comedies, hence the co-editor, Rowland Wymer and the editor
decided to widen the volume's scope. Articles may cover any aspect of the
relationship between Shakespeare plays and historical events, circumstances,
personages, contemporary or modern historical writing, etc. The deadline for
contributions is June 1995. Please send offers as soon as possible to Professor
H.M. Klein, Institut fuer Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Universitaet Salzburg,
Akademiestr. 24, A-5020 Salzburg, Tel. +43-662-8044-4422; Fax +43-662-8044-613,
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
Contributions are also being invited to Vol. 7 (1996) entitled "SHAKESPEARE AND
HUNGARY", which will embrace studies of translations, critical reception,
creative reception - imitations, adaptations, parodies, travesties, transmedial
adaptations, etc. - literary analogues, productions, school- viz. university
curricula, theatrical production, or other forms and areas of impact. The
co-editor is Peter Davidhazi. The deadline for submitting articles is January
1996, please send offers to Holger Klein at Salzburg (see above).
 
Later volumes will deal with: Hamlet on Screen (No.8, 1997, co-editor Dimiter
Daphinoff), Shakespeare and Japan (No. 9, 1998, co-editor Peter Milward) and
Shakespeare and Italy (No.10, 1999, co-editor Michele Marrapodi)."
 
Please edit this announcement as you see fit. I should be most grateful for its
dissemination.
 
Best wishes and regards,
Yours sincerely,
Holger Klein
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Luc Borot <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 95 17:25:21 +0100
Subject:        Cahiers Elisabethains
 
Dear all,
 
Cahiers Elisabethains inform their collaborators and readers that they now have
an e-mail address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
 
An ftp server is being set up to speed up communication and exchanges between
the editors and contributors. Access rights will be granted to contributors
between the acceptance of their papers and the publication of the issue where
they will appear.
 
The e-mail address can be used for subscription request, to propose a paper,
play-review, book-review, film-review, record-review or note. Mail will be
retrieved by the Montpellier editors, Angela Maguin, not online yet, Jean-Marie
Maguin (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), Luc Borot (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), or
Patricia Dorval, who also acts as business editor (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).
 
A W3 server will be available this Spring, with access to the library's
catalogue through a WAIS database. More of this when it is ready.
 
Due to growing rampant illiteracy in the administrative spheres of French
academe and ministeries, the Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Elisabethaines
has had to change its name to Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur la
Renaissance Anglaise. Our contacts in decision-making agencies seemed more and
more unable to understand the meaning of the adjective 'elisabethain'. We
sometimes found it spelt 'Elisabeth Hun' or under other homophonic forms. It
became more and more difficult to ask funds from local (or even national)
boards in which no one knew what this word meant, so we (mournfully) decided
that our 25th anniversary, which will soon be here, was the right occasion for
a change of name. Our first concession (and hopefully the last) to militant
technocratic ignorance.
 
As some of our regular partners and friends are members of SHAKSPER, we take
the liberty of using SHAKSPER to publish this piece of information.
 
                Cheers to all,
                        For the C.E.R.R.A. (I'm not used to it yet),
                                                        Luc Borot
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Phillips <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 19 Jan 1995 12:27:59 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Ben Jonson Journal
 
*****************************************************************
*****************  _The Ben Jonson Journal_  ********************
*****************************************************************
 
Editors Richard Harp and Stanley Stewart are pleased to announce that the first
issue of the _Ben Jonson Journal_ will be released this month.
 
_The Ben Jonson Journal_ is devoted to the study of Jonson as well as all
English Renaissance authors and their cultural, historical, and religious
milieux. Published annually, each issue will be at least two hundred pages.
 
Volume I features essays and reviews from our distinguised editorial board:
David M. Bevington, Martin Butler, Thomas Clayton, Ian Donaldson, Robert C.
Evans, M. Thomas Hester, Grace Ioppolo, William W. Kerrigan, Anthony Low, David
C. McPherson, John Mulryan, Stephen Orgel, James A. Riddell, E.W. Tayler, Sara
van den Berg, Susanne Woods, and R.V. Young.
 
Volume II is nearly complete, and the editors are now accepting manuscripts for
Volume III. Articles should be 20-30 double-spaced manuscript pages, notes up
to 10 pages, style: Chicago. Three copies of the manuscript are required. The
journal also reviews books, but book reviews are assigned.
 
Manuscripts should be sent to: The Editors, Department of English, UNLV, Box
455069, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154-5069. Rejected manuscripts
will be returned with SASE.
 
Subscriptions to the jounal are $15 for one year, $25 for two years.
Subscribers may use the form provided below. For additional information,
contact Richard Harp at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (702) 895- 0991 or Stan Stewart at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (909) 787-3674.
 
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D.C. Performance Studies Meeting

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0035. Thursday, 19 January, 1995.
 
From:           Cynthia Wimmer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. >(cm74)
Date:           Monday, 09 Jan 95 14:12 EST
Subject:        D.C.Meeting
 
[Please forward the announcement below to any lists which discuss the fields
mentioned.    Thank you.   Hope many folks will be able participate in this
gathering!]
 
             Attend a Mid-Atlantic Discussion about
                        PERFORMANCE STUDIES
 the field that draws from anthropology, ritual studies, art, theatre,
  dance, music, speech communications, philosophy, & literary theory.
 
                  Saturday, February 18, 1995, 11 am - 4 pm
                Anne Arundel Hall, U of Maryland, College Park
 
        With Bruce McConachie, Editor _Theatre Annual_,
                Gay Gibson Cima, Georgetown U., and
                Representatives from NEA and NEH
 
        Sponsored by the Performance Studies Focus Group (PSFG)
        of The Association for Theatre in Higher Education (ATHE)
 
        To reserve your space at this meeting, contact Cynthia Wimmer,
        Executive Committee of PSFG, at (301) 649-7585, or
        This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., by FEBRUARY 1, 1995.
 
           No registration fee will be charged for this meeting.
 
        For information on overnight accomodations at U of MD's Inn and
                Conference Center, call (800) 727-8622.
 
Cynthia Wimmer
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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