1995

Re: Virginia Woolf and the Renaissance

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0258.  Thursday, 30 March 1995.
 
From:           Sally Greene <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 22:34:28 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Woolf & Renaissance: Call for Essays
 
                *Virginia Woolf:  Renaissance Woman*
 
As a follow-up to a special session on Virginia Woolf and the Renaissance at
the 1994 Modern Language Association conference, I am editing a collection of
essays on Woolf and any aspect of the Renaissance, English or Continental.
That all three MLA panelists are primarily Renaissance scholars reflects the
fact that Woolf studies have expanded beyond twentieth-century British and
American specialization.
 
To complete the collection, I am searching for the best of the new work being
done in this emerging area.
 
Send detailed abstracts or completed essays to me by September 15, 1995,
together with a brief biography emphasizing relevant work.  If you'd like to
chat about the project before then, please do so!
 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Sally Greene
Department of English
CB 3520
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, N.C.  27599-3520

Qs: Shakespeare and Company; Polish Question RE: Devil

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0257.  Thursday, 30 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 95 09:55:13 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare & Co Training
 
(2)     From:   Pawel Rutkowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 26 Mar 1995 23:16:51 +0200
        Subj:   Devil
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 95 09:55:13 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare & Co Training
 
Dear fellow SHAKSPEReans:
 
I'm going to be a participant in Shakespeare & Company's month-long intensive
training program for theater professionals this May-June. Despite the fact that
I haven't done any theater work since high school (except a bit of dramaturgy),
my statement was persuasive enough to the director of training that he called
to talk with me and admitted me on the basis of our conversation. I just
wondered if any of you have participated in this program. It's _very_ intense:
6 days a week, 13 hours a day, and covers multiple aspects of text analysis,
perfomance (voice, movement, stage combat, dance, etc.), the place of theater
in the contemporary world, and on. I'm very excited about going, but would love
to hear from anyone who has worked with this group in a training program like
this or any of their other programs. Post to me directly
(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) unless you think the information would be of
interest to the rest of the list.
 
Many thanks,
Chris Gordon
University of Minnesota
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Pawel Rutkowski <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 26 Mar 1995 23:16:51 +0200
Subject:        Devil
 
[SHAKSPEReans,
 
Requests like the one below arrive every now and again.  If anyone feels so
moved as to respond, please do so directly to Pawel Rutkowski at
<This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>.  --HMC]
 
Dear Dr. Cook,
 
I am currently writing my M.A. thesis on "The Devil's Metamorphosis in English
Renaissance Drama". My work is well under way, but I thought that perhaps you
might have some interesting comments or suggestions concerning the topic in
general or a good choice of reading materials. The thesis is, among other
things, concerned with changing attitudes towards the Devil (or rather Satan)
himself; from Satan feared to Satan admired and, eventually, ridiculed. I will
be grateful for any help you can give.
 
Best regards,
Pawel Rutkowski.

Re: Killing Duncan

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0255.  Thursday, 30 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 00:29:05 -0500
        Subj:   Killing Duncan
 
(2)     From:   Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 09:17:18 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Killing Duncan
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 00:29:05 -0500
Subject:        Killing Duncan
 
Who said anything about a morality play? Don Foster has pitted himself against
the "conscience" interpretation, which is fine, but he will have to admit I
never mentioned it.
 
I agree! Macbeth's cosmic predicament and his attitude about it comprise a
manifest paramount forefront concern of the play.
 
Now let's concentrate on the actual contention: in the richly metaphysical
speech that includes and follows the dagger hallucination, isn't it true that
Macbeth is working up his courage for the looming event, and isn't it true that
he does it by attributing responsibility to anything at hand, in fact the
universe itself? How does that fit into a theory that says the universe being
responsible is exactly what Macbeth is afraid of?
 
And what do we do with these observations: that he explicitly invokes the
cosmos to assist him ("stars hide your fires" "thou sure and firm-set earth
hear not my steps" et al); that he eventually abandons his human accomplice in
favor of supernatural alliance; and that he believes and hopes his life is
charmed until his last seconds onstage?
 
What Foster says (with a nod to Kenneth Burke) is true:
 
>...murder...is a crime that...dares the metaphysical order to assert itself
 
but this dare takes a different (less willful) shape in a man who thinks the
metaphysical order is on his side.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 09:17:18 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Killing Duncan
 
A quick p.s. to my last posting on *Macbeth* (which was a rejoinder to Scott
Shepherd):  I seem there to imply that Scott's reading of *Macbeth* represents
"reductive thinking" (Sorry, Scott!). Those who have read Scott's work know
that his work is richly nuanced.  It is not Scott's remarks, but a whole
tradition of oppositional thinking re: *Macbeth* that I find inadequate to
account for Macbeth's layered and conflicted subjectivity.  It has been
tempting to read the tragedy as a simple morality play in which Lady Macbeth
plays the evil angel and Macbeth's Christian conscience the good angel,
struggling for his soul.  Don Foster

Re: Blacks in London; Clues in the Verse

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0256.  Thursday, 30 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 08:47:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Blacks in London
 
(2)     From:   Frances Helphinstine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 95 14:48:35 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0246  Re: Reading Clues in the Verse
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Foster <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 08:47:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Blacks in London
 
A follow-up to the recent discussion of blacks in London:  My Vassar colleague,
Gretchen Gerzina, has written a book not to be missed. *Black England* will be
published this September in the UK by John Murray Publishers.  *Black London*
(same book, re-titled) will be published by Rutgers University Press about Feb.
1996, with a paperback edition in '97.
 
For inquiries contact
Gretchen Holbrook Gerzina
Vassar College, Maildrop 466
Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Don Foster
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frances Helphinstine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 95 14:48:35 EST
Subject: 6.0246  Re: Reading Clues in the Verse
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0246  Re: Reading Clues in the Verse
 
30 Mar. l995
 
Last Thursday, at the Shakespeare Association of America, in Chicago, at the
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA rehearsal demonstration, the director says that caesura
ends speed up the movement to the next statement in contrast to emphatic pause
for end of line closure.
 
Fran Helphinstine

Re: Early Modern Subjectivity

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0254.  Thursday, 30 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 11:38:56 +0100 (BST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0251 Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
(2)     From:   Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 19:18:04 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0251  Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
(3)     From:   Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, March 30, 1995
        Subj:   Early Modern Subjectivity
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 11:38:56 +0100 (BST)
Subject: 6.0251 Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0251 Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
Wes Folkerth recommends Jonathan Dollimore's _Radical Tragedy_ on early modern
subjectivity. Dollimore's anti-essentialist reading of the period now seems to
be widely accepted as axiomatic. Wes may be interested in a forthcoming article
by Tom McAlindon challenging Dollimore's evidence and assumptions ('Cultural
Materialism and the Ethics of Reading: or, the Radicalizing of Jacobean
Tragedy', _MLR_, 90 (1995), Part IV (October). Dollimore's evidence is also
discussed in my own _Elizabethan Mythologies_, Cambridge University Press, 1994
(Introduction, chap 5 and conclusion).
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Mar 1995 19:18:04 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0251  Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0251  Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
Bill,
 
Having been honored to be asked by you at the SAA about the concept of
subjectivity and not having done a very good job of answering, I'll follow up
by pointing you towards Alan Sinfield's chapter entitled "When Is a Character
Not a Character? Desdemona, Olivia, Lady Macbeth, and Subjectivity" in his
*Faultlines: Cultural Materialism and the Politics of Dissident Reading*.  I
just finished reading it again and found that it cleared up the issue very
effectively for me.
 
                                                Michael Friedman
                                                University of Scranton
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, March 30, 1995
Subject:        Early Modern Subjectivity
 
Making no claims whatsoever to expertise on this topic, nevertheless, whenever
I think of the issue of Early Modern Subjectivity, I recall one of the most
interesting cultural exchanges of my life.
 
About twenty years ago, between one of my various incarnations as a graduate
student, I had the privilege of tutoring a visiting Japanese scientist in
English.  She was born in the late thirties, being eight or nine during the
American occupation after the war.  She was a professor at the University of
Tokyo and a leading expert in a particular form of liver cancer endemic to
Japan, yet she was thoroughly traditional: I learned that she husband did not
address her by her first name and that a "bad" wife leaves tea leaves in the
sink drain.
 
However, what struck me the most from our conversations was our completely
different notions of personal autonomy -- subjectivity if you will.  She was
intrigued that I would see a psychiatrist.  No, not intrigued -- she apparently
had no concept of my need to devote such attention to myself.  In turn, I
learned about her deep, abiding sense of duty to her family, her society, her
group identity.
 
These conversations have made a lifelong impression on me.  I learned first
hand that my -- and by extention my culture's -- sense of self was only one of
many ways of perceiving one's self and one's relations to others.  There were
alternatives to my childhood images of John Wayne sitting on a split rail
fence and smoking a Camel cigarette, my emblem for "western" individualism.
 
The developing of this "western" sense of self constitutes part of my
understanding of what is meant by the development Early Modern Subjectivity,
the changing, substituting, transforming one concept of self with another.

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