Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: *Romeo and Juliet*; Love
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0145.  Wednesday, 1 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Frank Savukinas <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 12:50:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Maturity in R & J
 
(2)     From:   Don Foster <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 16:51:22 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(3)     From:   Catherine Fitzmaurice <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 21:37:50 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
 
(4)     From:   Melissa Aaron <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 20:38:37 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Savukinas <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 12:50:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Maturity in R & J
 
I completely agree with Dan How's comments on how people in Shakespeare's time
were considered more mature at a younger age. It is a fact that Lady Capulet
was 28 and that girls younger than the 14-year-old Juliet were married and had
children. In Act 1, Scene 3, Lady Capulet says to Juliet: "Well think of
marriage now./Younger than you, here in Verona, ladies of esteem/Are made
already mothers./By my count I was your mother much upon these years that you
are now a maid."
 
To assume the ages of the Monatgues would be just speculation as the text does
not give us any clue.
 
We can safely assume that the Capulet's marriage was arranged. We can also
assume that Paris is much older than Juliet. Can we also assume that Lord
Capulet is also much older than his Lady. We do know that he has had other
children who have died. In Act 1, Scene 2, Capulet says to Paris: "The earth
hath swallowed all my hopes but she."
 
Since I have rattled on longer than I should have about ages, I've been trying
to figure out the approximate age of the Nurse. We know that she has a daughter
who would've been around Juliet's age had she lived. The Nurse mentions her as
"Susan" in 1.3. This idea would suggest that the Nurse is not very old.
 
However, in that same scene, the Nurse remarks: "I'll lay fourteen of my
teeth/Yet to my teen be it spoken I have but four,"
 
This would suggest that she is pretty old if she has only four teeth,
Any thoughts.
 
Keep the R & J coming!!!!
Frank Savukinas

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Foster <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 16:51:22 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
In reply to Frank Savukinas' question, "Can somebody please give me a reason
why Romeo and Juliet's marriage would not have lasted? After all it was true
love."  Let's call it "fictional love," of which there are many varieties, not
just in Shakespeare generally, but within *Romeo and Juliet.* And the marriage
of R&J *doesn't* last because the play ends.  We are, after all, speaking of
fictional characters with no existence beyond the script.  But if one is
inclined to extend the fiction with a fictive future of our own making, Maxine
Kumin's vision seems about right:
 
And suppose the darlings get to Mantua,
suppose they cheat the crypt, what next? Begin
with him, unshaven.  Though not, I grant you,
a displeasing cockerel, there's egg yolk on his chin.
His seedy robe's aflap, he's got the rheum.
Poor dear, the cooking lard has smoked her eye.
Another Montague is in the womb
although the first babe's bottom's not yet dry.
She scrolls a weekly letter to her Nurse
who dares to send a smock through Balthasar,
and once a month, his father posts a purse.
News from Verona? Always news of war.
  Such sour years it takes to right this wrong!
  The fifth act runs unconscionably long.
 
--fr. M. Kumin, *The Privilege* (NY: Harper & Row, 1963, p.67)
 
Don Foster
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Catherine Fitzmaurice <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 21:37:50 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
 
"hedgehog" is NOT an endearment! They are spiky little beasts - not the cute
cartoons one might see now, or in Beatrix Potter. Lady Anne's line "Dost grant
me, hedgehog?" is surely only shocked irony, and furious.
 
Catherine Fitzmaurice

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Tuesday, 28 Feb 1995 20:38:37 +0200
Subject: 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
 
>I am not sure that all Shakespeare's couples fall in love immediately; I am
>thinking of early on in Richard III, when Gloucester has that long scene with
>Anne, and he asks her to "take up the sword again, or take up me."  He manages
>the impossible, to get her to marry him, when he has just killed her husband as
>well as the king.
>John Mucci
 
I pass this on, knowing that my professor Andrew Weiner may not have signed up
on the net group yet (though he was thinking of it.)  Last spring, he suggested
that Richard's strategy is that of the sonneteer--"Love me, or you're killing
me.--In fact, go ahead, kill me."  If that's true, then outwardly Richard seems
a lot like Romeo, or Astrophil-- "pity grace obtain."  The difference, of
course, is that Richard is manipulating the conventions for his own ends.  But
by the conventions, Anne can only be cruel for so long.  And that, campers, is
the definition of socially-constructed love.  Why does Richard do it?  Well, it
works.
 
Melissa Aaron
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.