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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Lost Play
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0148.  Thursday, 2March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Tad Davis <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 11:45:36 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0143  Qs: Lost Play
 
(2)     From:   Patricia E. Gallagher <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 12:23:37 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   "Lost Play" on TV
 
(3)     From:   Ron Macdonald <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Mar 1995 15:39:29 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Love's Labour's Won
 
(4)     From:   Fran Teague <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Mar 1995 18:41:01 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0143  Q: Lost Play
 
(5)     From:   Bill Grantham <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 16:54:04 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0143  Qs: Lost Play;
 
(6)     From:   Imtiaz Habib <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 20:03:02 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0143 Q: Lost Play
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tad Davis <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 11:45:36 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0143  Qs: Lost Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0143  Qs: Lost Play
 
Michael Field asks about the source of speculation about a play by Shakespeare
called "Love's Labors Won."
 
I believe the play was first mentioned by Francis Meres (in Palladis Tamia?,
1599?) as an example of Shakespeare's facility with comedy ("witness his Loves
Labours Lost, his Loves Labours Wonne," etc.). I don't recall if it was ever
mentioned elsewhere; it may appear in a Stationer's entry around the same time.
 
One thing I do remember is watching a television interview with Samuel
Schoenbaum many years ago where he described one of his most satisfying
fantasies: browsing around a bookstall on the streets of Amsterdam and picking
up a slim volume, opening it, and finding Loves Labours Wonne.
 
Regarding other lost or misattributed plays by Shakespeare, there's a new book
by Eric Sams, about Shakespeare's first 30 years, where he argues again for
Shakespeare's authorship of "Edmund Ironsides" (as well as arguing that the
stories of Shakespeare as a butcher's boy and deer-poacher may be true after
all). My guess is that his arguments are not likely to win wide acceptance, but
they're great fun to read.
 
     Tad Davis
     
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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia E. Gallagher <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 12:23:37 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        "Lost Play" on TV
 
I believe I know the TV detective show you seek. It was an old (late '60s early
'70s) show called "The Name of the Game".  It was about three men who worked
for the same magazine company; two as reporters (each for a different magazine
put out by the company), the third was the owner/editor.
 
The episode in question, I believe featured Joseph Cotton as the discoverer of
the lost play. I clearly remember the play being destroyed in the end by the
mad housekeeper. However, I believe the play was an early version of "Hamlet".
 
Other than that, my only recollection was that Susan St. James (a regular on
the show) figured heavily in the action. I cannot remember which of the three
other regulars was featured.
 
Hope this helps.
 
Patricia Gallagher
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ron Macdonald <
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Date:           Wednesday, 01 Mar 1995 15:39:29 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Love's Labour's Won
 
Michael Field is thinking of Francis Meres's mention of a "Love Labour's Won"
in his commonplace book _Palladis Tamia_ (1598): "As Plautus and Seneca are
accounted the best for comedy and tragedy among the Latins, so Shakespeare
among the English is the most excellent in both kinds for the stage; for
comedy, witness his _Gentlemen of Verona_, his _Errors_, his _Love Labour's
Lost_, his _Love Labour's Won_..."  This is, I believe, the first and only
contemporary mention of such a play.
 
                                       --Ron Macdonald
                                         <
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(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Fran Teague <
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Date:           Wednesday, 01 Mar 1995 18:41:01 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 6.0143  Q: Lost Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0143  Q: Lost Play
 
"Love's Labour's Won" was a real play, noted by Francis Meres in "Palladis
Tamia" (1598) and published in quarto by 1603, but no copy has survived.  See
T. W. Baldwin, "Shakespere's 'Love's Labor's Won," 1957. This info is given in
The Riverside Shakespeare.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Grantham <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 16:54:04 -0800
Subject: 6.0143  Qs: Lost Play;
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0143  Qs: Lost Play;
 
Love's Labour's Won is mentioned in Francis Meres' Palladis Tamia, Wit's
Treasury in 1598, along with references to other, known Shakespeare plays (Two
Gentlemen of Verona, Comedy of Errors, Midsummer Night's Dream, Merchant of
Venice, Richad II, Richard II, Henry IV, King John, Titus Andronicus and Romeo
and Juliet).  Meres also mentions the Sonnets.
 
People used to think Meres made a mistake, even though the other titles were
accurate.  But in 1953, a bookseller's catalogue from 1603 came to light
listing for sale both Love's Labour's Lost and Love's Labour's Won. So, it
either has to be a lost play, or an alternative title for one of Shakespeare's
known works.  Candidates for the latter honour, suggested by various critics,
have included Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado, All's Well, and Troilus and
Cressida.
 
Bill Grantham

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(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Imtiaz Habib <
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Date:           Wednesday, 1 Mar 1995 20:03:02 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0143 Q: Lost Play
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0143 Q: Lost Play
 
Try Sam Schoenbaum's Shakespeare: A Documentary Life for an account of the
Huntington's discovery of the spine of the Elizabethan bookseller's book list
which contained a listing of Love's Labor Won. So also Francis Meres' Palladis
Tamia. The "lost play" could also be As You Like It?
 

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