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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Bassanio/Portia; Malvolio; Sh in Park; Chronology
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0151.  Thursday, 2March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Helen Robinson <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 95 14:42:17 EST
        Subj:   Bassanio/Portia
 
(2)     From:   Patrick Venneri <
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        Date:   Thursday, 02 Mar 1995 07:22:06 +0000 (GMT)
        Subj:   Malvolio
 
(3)     From:   Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.BITNET>
        Date:   Wednesday, 01 Mar 1995 19:19:48 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shakespeare in the Park
 
(4)     From:   Dan T. M. How <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 05:13:22 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0146  Re: Chronology
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Helen Robinson <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 95 14:42:17 EST
Subject:        Bassanio/Portia
 
Dan How's comments on the opening dialogue of Act 111 Scene 2 certainly
clarified a number of points. There has been some conjecture that Bassanio is
not really in love with Portia and that he is merely following the dictates of
'courtly love'. His conversation with Antonio about Portia 'In Belmont is a
lady richly left' could be played as though Bassanio is primarily interested in
the lady's money not so much the lady. To give him his due he does say she is
fair.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patrick Venneri <
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Date:           Thuursday, 02 Mar 1995 07:22:06 +0000 (GMT)
Subject:        Malvolio
 
Dale Lyles:
 
You may be right about Malovlio's empty laughter, but as Norman Berlin was
wont to point out to us, the theaters are closed for 20 some years when
Charlie II loses his head, and wouldn't it be ironic if he did not in some
way get the last laugh as the religious force which was to sweep the country
stopped the music and revelry.  The artist as seer.
 
Patrick Venneri
The American University in Cairo
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bernice W. Kliman <KLIMANB@SNYFARVA.BITNET>
Date:           Wednesday, 01 Mar 1995 19:19:48 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare in the Park
 
Yes, Shakespeare in the Park continues, this summer with *Troilus and Cressida*
and *Tempest* I believe.
 
Bernice
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan T. M. How <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 05:13:22 -0800
Subject: 6.0146  Re: Chronology
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0146  Re: Chronology
 
In response to J. H. Link...
 
The chonology of Shakespeare's works is derived mainly through the quartros,
setting, and style.  An example of dating a work through quartos is finding the
earliest quarto of a play.  Most likely, the play was produced at around that
time.  Some were written down from memory, resulting in some entertaining
versions of famous monologues.
 
Another way to determine the approximate date of a play is to examine the
setting.  Shakespeare's acting troupe, "The King's Men" I think, moved a few
times into new theatres.  One such theatre was indoor, and his work reflected
this, moving from pastoral into dark interiors.  I can't remember, but I think
some of this information is in the Riverside introduction.  There is also a
time-line in there.
 
Style is also commonly used to date work.  The difference between his earlier
works and his later works can be seen in the structure and variety within the
iambic pentameter, and the language itself.  It isn't accurate to a date, but
experts can determine approximately where it lies along the progression of
Shakespeare's writing.
 
Looking back on your post, I hope I didn't tell you something you already knew.
 If you're asking about ONLY Cymb, WT and Temp, I don't think this was very
helpful.  Anyway, it might be interesting reading to others...
 
-dan
 

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