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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Richard and Anne
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0153.  Friday, 3 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   William Russell Mayes <
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        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 09:30:20 -0500
        Subj:   Re: Richard and Anne
 
(2)     From:   Dudley Knight <
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        Date:   Friday, 3 Mar 1995 01:31:49 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Russell Mayes <
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Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 09:30:20 -0500
Subject:        Re: Richard and Anne
 
The seduction / wooing scene between Richard and Anne is one of my favorites,
and I want to add a twist to Melissa Aaron's post about Richard as a
sonnetteer.  It seems to me that it is important to realize that there is a
third participant in this scene, the corpse of Anne's father in law, Henry VI,
whom Richard has killed.  When the scene begins, Anne is playing the mourner
and Richard comes in angry, playing the role of Anger as it were. During the
scene, Richard offers to switch roles with Anne; he plays the emotional
suppliant and gives her the chance to play the avenger.  She feints a couple of
times but is ultimately unable to pull it off.  Richard, it turns out, is much
more malleable than Anne (and most of the other characters), and it is his
flexibility that makes him so creepily successful throughout the play.  I think
Richard also sees this scene as a challenge: picking someone up at a funeral is
hardly appropriate, especially when you have killed the person in the corpse
(c.f. _The Player_).  In fact, Richard exults over this in his soliloquy that
ends I.ii:  "What?  I, that kill'd her husband and his father, / To take her in
her heart's extremest hate, / With curses in her mouth, tears in her eyes, /
The bleeding witness of my hatred by, / Having God, her conscience, and these
bars against me, / And I no friends to back my suit [at all] / But the plain
devil and dissembling looks? / And yet to win her!  All the world to nothing! /
Hah!" (230-38).  I love that "hah!"
 
W. Russell Mayes, Jr.
University of Virginia
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dudley Knight <
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Date:           Friday, 3 Mar 1995 01:31:49 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0140 Re: Love at First Sight
 
I heartily concur with Catherine Fitzmaurice regarding Lady Anne's "Dost grant
me, hedgehog?" Lady Anne is not in a terrific mood when she says this. What's
more, the use of the word hedgehog surely is a diminution to a common furtive
small beastie of the rather more fearsome wild hog that emblazons Richard's
coat of arms, and all his standards.(As in Garrick's interpolation for Hastings
"The Cat [Catesby], the Rat [Ratcliff], and Lovell the Dog/ Rule all England
under the Hog" [Richard], a couplet which Olivier found juicy enough to include
in his film.)
 
But I do have to say that, having held a hedgehog once (hey, it belonged to a
friend), they're not quite the "spiky little beasts" that Catherine Fitzmaurice
asserts. Their spikes are fairly blunt, and they tend to roll up and sleep a
lot, when they aren't ingesting grubs, their food of choice.
 
Dudley Knight
University of California--Irvine
 

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