Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Pronunciation
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0155.  Friday, 3 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Melissa Aaron <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 10:44:02 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0147 Re: Prounciation
 
(2)     From:   Ray Allen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 02 Mar 1995 12:26:39 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Name Pronuncation
 
(3)     From:   John Gouws <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 20:30:34 +0200 (GMT+0200)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0147  Re: Prounciation
 
(4)     From:   Michael Swanson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 13:39:23 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0147  Re: Prounciation
 
(5)     From:   Don Wall <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 02 Mar 1995 11:49:53 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Pronunciation
 
(6)     From:   Steven Gagen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 03 Mar 1995 16:44:35 +1100
        Subj:   Re: Pronuciation
 
(7)     From:   Anna Cole <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Monday, 27 Feb 1995 05:52:35 GMT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0143  Q: Prounciation of P & K
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 10:44:02 +0200
Subject: 6.0147 Re: Prounciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0147 Re: Prounciation
 
While "Kate" sometimes forms a pun with "cat,"  it also is used to pun with
"cate"--"for dainties are all cates, and therefore Kate."  Sorry to muddy the
waters.  Would "cate" be pronounced like "cat?"
 
M. Aaron
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ray Allen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 02 Mar 1995 12:26:39 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Name Pronuncation
 
For name pronunciation I use a book aimed exclusively at the question. The
title: _How To Pronounce The Names In Shakespeare_ (apt, huh?) It was
copyrighted in 1919 and the author is Theodora U. Irvine. ISBN 1-55888-911-6.
It costs around $48.  If everyone already has it on their shelves, my apologies
for wasting your eyesight.
 
Ray Allen
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Gouws <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 20:30:34 +0200 (GMT+0200)
Subject: 6.0147  Re: Prounciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0147  Re: Prounciation
 
> I've always assumed (I guess from the iambic pentameter) that "Romeo" was
> pronounced as two syllables rather than three: Rome-yo as opposed to
> Rome-eee-o. But the last two productions of the play I've seen have used the
> three-syllable moniker. Expert opinion? (other than mine?)
>
> O Rome-e-o, Rome-e-o, Where-fore art thou Rome-e-o: feminine dactylic
> tetrameter?
 
Surely "Romeo" is disyllabic in this instance: Rom-yo.  This is supported by
Helge Koekeritz, _Shakespeare's Names_.
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Swanson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 2 Mar 1995 13:39:23 -0500
Subject: 6.0147  Re: Prounciation
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0147  Re: Prounciation
 
Scansion need not mean that every line is in absolute iambic rhythm.  Iambic
pentameter in Shakespeare really means that the basic rhythm is iambic, and
that the basic structure is pentameter.  But there are plenty of lines which
don't scan in pentameter, and have 8, 9, 11, or 12 syllables.  And plenty of
metric feet are only possible as trochees, spondees, pyrrhics, or even dactyls
or anapests.  So, Romeo need not be RoMEo.  Check Cecily Berry, The Actor and
The Text, for more info on this.
 
(5)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Don Wall <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 02 Mar 1995 11:49:53 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Pronunciation
 
About the pun on "household Kates"--why not another pun on "household CATES"
[choice viands, tasty morsels, nourishing delicacies]?  It seems also to fit
the context.
 
Don Wall
Eastern Washington University
 
(6)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Steven Gagen <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 03 Mar 1995 16:44:35 +1100
Subject:        Re: Pronuciation
 
> In AYLI, shouldn't Rowland de Boys be pronounced "Rowlan de Buwah"?
> de Boys is akin to old French.
 
No!  Old French did not have the "wah" pronunciation of "oi", neither did it
have the present gutteral "r", rather Rs were rolled, as in some present-day
English dialects.  Loius XIV would have called himself something like "le
rrroi-yee", as close as I can get it in English.  I understand that the old
French pronunciations are preserved to some extent in French Canada.
 
Best Regards,
Steve Gagen.
 
(7)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anna Cole <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Monday, 27 Feb 1995 05:52:35 GMT
Subject: 6.0143  Q: Prounciation of P & K
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0143  Q: Prounciation of P & K
 
Re the pronunciation of Kate.  I think it unlikely that it would have been
pronounced as Kat.  There is some evidence of Shakespeare's partiality for the
name.  He gives it to Hotspur's wife Lady Percy as well as the Shrew herself.
His intention it seems to me is to depict a woman of spirit, not of
spitefulness which is the usual association with cats.
 
Anna Cole
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.