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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Malvolio; Richard; Lost Play
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0160.  Saturday, 4 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Sara Cave <
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        Date:   Friday, 3 Mar 1995 10:19:57 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0156  Re: Malvolio
 
(2)     From:   David Middleton <
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        Date:   Friday, 03 Mar 95 09:52:27 CST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0153  Richard and Anne
 
(3)     From:   David Evett <R0870%
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        Date:   Friday, 03 Mar 1995 12:55 ET
        Subj:   Love's Labours Wonne
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sara Cave <
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Date:           Friday, 3 Mar 1995 10:19:57 EST
Subject: 6.0156  Re: Malvolio
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0156  Re: Malvolio
 
In a recent (September '94) production of TWELFTH NIGHT at the Atlanta
Shakespeare Tavern, the character of Malvolio hissed out in great anger his
revengeful last line. This stunned the other actors, and indeed the audience,
into an uncomfortable silence. As Malvolio stalked his way down the ramp
leading from stage to the door, he lost his footing and tripped. It was so
realistic that there were gasps from the audience, then a small pause existed
before the entire theatre erupted into uproarious laughter. It was a
wonderfully captured moment, and one I feel encapsulated the essence of the
character.
 
Sincerely,

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(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Middleton <
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Date:           Friday, 03 Mar 95 09:52:27 CST
Subject: 6.0153  Richard and Anne
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0153  Richard and Anne
 
My question to William Mayes is what happens to that marvellous "flexability"
of Richard's by the end of the show? All the vitality, the bustling energy
appears drained from him, and he has to resort to drink to raise his spirits.
He is as notably unsuccessful at wooing Elizabeth (through her mother) as he
was brilliantly effective with Anne earlier.  Is the difference a matter of
development  of character or an implicit critique of the nasty will-to-power of
Machiavellianism, which,ironically, at last evolves necessarily from power to
will, will to appetite, and "eats up himself." I'm intrigued by what looks like
a simple question: why does Richard 3 ultimately fail?  Can one explain that in
terms of " flexability?"
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%
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Date:           Friday, 03 Mar 1995 12:55 ET
Subject:        Love's Labours Wonne
 
In their delightful historical spoof, _No Bed for Bacon_, Caryl Brahms and S.
J. Simon (the pseudonym of S. J. Tarnowski) follow the vicissitudes of
Shakespeare's life for several weeks.  During this period he repeatedly sits
down in some quiet corner of an otherwise busy place--theater or tavern or
anteroom--and writes "Love's Labours Wonne" at the top of a page (in one
instance he gets as far as the first stage direction: "The Garden of Eden.
Enter Adam and Eve") only to be interrupted by Francis Bacon seeking a little
editorial help (read extensive rewriting) with a set of essays he's trying to
publish. The result is to interfere with the play, which never does get
written. The explanation is as satisfactory as most.  So is the explanation for
the famous puzzle from the will referred to in the title--but I'll let you all
find the book (very superior summer reading) and check that out for yourselves.
 
Laboriously,
Dave Evett
 

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