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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0168.  Monday, 6 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Dan T. M. How <
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        Date:   Saturday, 4 Mar 1995 19:15:46 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0165  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
(2)     From:   Frank Savukinas <
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        Date:   Sunday, 5 Mar 1995 18:52:54 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0165 Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Dan T. M. How <
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Date:           Saturday, 4 Mar 1995 19:15:46 -0800
Subject: 6.0165  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0165  Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
In response to Sean Lawrence...
 
"teen" in this context is defined by the OED as meaning, "suffering, grief,
woe".  There's a definite pun possibility there, and it really depends on how
you interpret the line, but I think those lines (13-14) can be interpreted as
"I'd bet fourteen of my teeth, even though to my sorrow I have only four, that
she's not fourteen."
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Frank Savukinas <
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Date:           Sunday, 5 Mar 1995 18:52:54 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0165 Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0165 Re: *Romeo and Juliet*
 
>RE:R&J I have three questions about the final scene and I would appreciate any
>and all considered opinions- 1) "Tybalt, liest thou there in thu bloody sheet?"
>Would the Caps really have laid Tyb out without cleaning him up or is this a
>metaphor for shroud or what thinkst thou? 2)"Thy husband in thy bosom there
>lies dead" does this mean that Romeo has literally fallen on her chest and
>she's talking and doesnt realize this or are we talking metaphor again? 3)"A
>cup clos'd in my true love's hand" are we to believe that Romeo hauls in a
>chalice and some thing to pour liquid out of and stops the scne to mix this
>toddy for himself and if not why doesnt she say vial- I know cup clos'ed is
>better sounding than vial clos'd but I always assume Shakespeare was telling me
>something and maybe I'm missing it.
 
In response to your first question about Tybalt and the "bloody sheet," I think
that it was a metaphor for a shroud as you suggested.
 
Secondly, I don't think Shakespeare meant for Romeo to fall "in" her bosom.
Romeo would probably have fallen next to the bosom, presumably on the ground
next to Juliet.
 
Finally,  I always assumed that after leaving the apothecary, Romeo found some
readily available liquid like water before he and Balthasar rode back to
Verona. Technically, a cup and vial are the same thing.
 
Frank Savukinas

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