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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Non-Traditional Shakespeare Pieces
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0175.  Tuesday, 7 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Timothy Reed <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Mar 1995 08:35:08 -0700
        Subj:   Dogg's Hamlet
 
(2)     From:   Roger D. Gross <
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        Date:   Monday, 6 Mar 1995 20:36:17 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   more non-trad Shakes
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Timothy Reed <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Mar 1995 08:35:08 -0700
Subject:        Dogg's Hamlet
 
Roger Gross suggests the following for a non-traditional Shakespeare festival:
 
"Tom Stoppard wrote a ca. 15-minute version of HAMLET called DOGG'S HAMLET
(published in a Faber and Faber volume: DOGG'S HAMLET, CAHOOT'S MACBETH, 1980.
As a "curtain call", it also provides a 2- or 3-minute version.  I use it
occasionally in my Acting Shakespeare class when I need to work on the SIZE
Shakespeare asks of actors.  It is wild and funny."
 
I performed in a production of "Dogg's Hamlet, Cahoot's Macbeth" and am
familiar with the conditions required for the granting of performance rights.
(Off the top of my head, I can't remember whether Dramatist's Play Service or
Samuel French hold the rights.) Performance rights are only granted to those
who will perform both works together, in their entirety. Performance of just
the Hamlet portions of "Dogg's Hamlet" is a violation of Stoppard's copyright.
Although the text is Shakespeare, the particular cutting of it is under
Stoppard's copyright. Either get a waiver from the holder of the copyright, or
simpler still, do your own cutting of Hamlet.
 
Timothy Reed
The Upstart Crow Theatre Company, Boulder, Colorado
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger D. Gross <
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Date:           Monday, 6 Mar 1995 20:36:17 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        more non-trad Shakes
 
Here are two amusing abuses of Shakespeare I neglected to mention in my first
post on the topic.
 
Bernard Shaw wrote two short plays "about" Shakespeare, whom he had to love but
couldn't stand to hear praised so much.
 
 
        THE DARK LADY OF THE SONNETS, a funny, short one-act with Willy as a
very sweet and simple fellow, waiting in the garden of the Palace of an evening
for his Dark Lady.  As he waits, several more or less famous folks pass through
and we see, as William scribbles down the jewels that fall from their lips,
where he got his best lines.
 
        SHAKES VERSUS SHAV, which Shaw calls a puppet play.  It is probably the
last script he wrote.  It's very short.  The two characters are Shakespeare and
Shaw (plus cameos by Capt. Shotover who Shaw calls "my Lear", Macbeth, and Rob
Roy).  Shakespeare wins the boxing match. From there on its a "could you have
written this?" match. Very short.
 
Roger Gross
Drama
Univ. of Arkansas
 

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