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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Freeman's *Folio Scripts*
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0212.  Wednesday, 15 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:58:13 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0208  Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:59:14 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
(3)     From:   David M Richman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 10:32:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:58:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0208  Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0208  Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
The address is:
 
                Folio Scripts
                2515 Caledonia Avenue
                Deep Cove
                District of North Vancouver
                British Columbia
                Canada  V7G 1T8
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
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Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:59:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
Since I'm taking a course with Neil Freeman at the moment, specifically on the
use of early texts in acting, I thought I'd reply to the query regarding the
Folio Scripts.  The address at the back of my text is 2515 Caledonia Avenue,
Deep Cove, District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V7G 1T8, or
telephone 1-604-924-1401.  Yes, he has done a _Winter's Tale_.  The hard copy
is $20.00 including tax, and a Mac disk version is $50.00, which you can edit
down to a working text more easily.
 
BTW, there's also a companion volume (also privately printed--apparently
someone wanted a lot of copies in a hurry) called _Shakespeare's First Texts_
and costing $22.50.  It's what we're working through in class. The study is
rather intriguing, using the early punctuation, etc., as guides to
pronunciation, often linking them closely with Elizabethan rhetorical style, as
well as modern acting method.  This may seem like a contradiction, but it works
in practice, which is the acid test.
 
The Folio text of _Hamlet_ was used for the Winnipeg production, reviewed
extensively on this list a short while ago.
 
Cheers,
Sean.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 10:32:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
This is in response to Skip Shand's useful and informative posting on Freeman's
*Scripts.*
 
While I have not yet made use of these myself, I have done what is perhaps the
next best thing--videlicet:  I have based performances I have worked on for the
last several years on the Oxford Text Archive Folio and Quarto texts.  I have
modernized *some* spelling, but have preserved punctuation (quite useful--with
Skip Shand's caveats) capitalization, and versification.  A sense of short
lines, Hamlet's "no", or Helena's "Yes, faith" is enormously useful--essential,
I would say.
 
I have detected a tendency (perhaps my own paranoia) to elevate one early text
over another.  (Canonize the Folio over the Quarto, or vice versa.) The real
usefulness of Oxford Text Archive is that it gives you both texts, Q and F.
You may choose, for example, to include or cut Lear's mock trial or Hamlet's
"How all occasions" soliloquy--to give the two most controversial examples.  If
You were consulting only the Folio texts, you would not have such choices.  In
sum, the early texts remain live, essential sources for performers and
directors, as well as for scholars and editors.  Let us be grateful that such
texts are so much more readily available than they were ten or fifteen years
ago.
 
David Richman
University of New Hampshire
 

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