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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Africans in London; Picard's Sh; Hero; Characters
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0216.  Thursday, 16 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Anthony Martin <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 12:30:28 +0900
        Subj:   Africans in Shakespeare's London
 
(2)     From:   Douglas M Lanier <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 14:01:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   J-L Picard's Shakespeare edition
 
(3)     From:   Michael Friedman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 16:47:42 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0202  Re: Hero
 
(4)     From:   Michael Saenger <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 18:09:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Characters (Was *MM* Ending)
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Martin <
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Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 12:30:28 +0900
Subject:        Africans in Shakespeare's London
 
Eldred Jones (_Othello's Countrymen_) refers to research by W. E. Miller, who
found four Negroes to be living in the one parish of All Hallows in 1599, and
to the state order for the expulsion of the *great number of Negars and
blackamoors* in 1601. There is also some research by Leslie Hotson on this
matter, but I have mislaid the reference.
 
It is therefore possible, though still unlikely, that Africans were in some way
involved with the theatre at the time.
 
Anthony Martin
Waseda University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <
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Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 14:01:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        J-L Picard's Shakespeare edition
 
My understanding is that the edition displayed in Picard's office on the Star
Trek:  The Next Generation show and in the movie Generations is the Globe
Illustrated edition.  I am told by fans that the staff took great pride in
changing the pages of the edition for each show.
 
Since inquiring minds want to know,
Doug Lanier

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 16:47:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0202  Re: Hero
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0202  Re: Hero
 
Just to offer an alternative that no one else has put forward yet, why not
explore the possibility that Hero is marrying Claudio as much to please her
father as she is because she loves the young Count?  In 2.1, she acquiesces to
Leonato's request that she marry Don Pedro ("If the Prince do solicit you in
that kind, you know your answer"), and the text never shows her speaking her
love for Claudio aloud, aside from the phrase, "my dear Claudio" in 3.1.  It
has always seemed significant to me that Hero faints, according to the text,
right after Leonato's exclamation, "Hath no man's dagger here a point for me?"
the first time that he shows that he believes the accusations against her are
true.  Although many productions rearrange the text to imply that Hero's faint
occurs in response to Claudio's exit (and therefore as a climax to his
abandonment of her), I would find it interesting to see a Hero faint in such a
way that it says to us, "What?  After all I've done to try to please you,
Father, even you doubt my chastity?"
 
                                                Michael Friedman
                                                University of Scranton
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Saenger <
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Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 18:09:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Characters (Was *MM* Ending)
 
Several people responded negatively to my post regarding plays being fictions.
Throughout history, lovers of Shakespeare have praised him for being like them.
Now it is popular to say that he is a realist, which has much more to do with
the 20th century than the 17th.  Look at the play objectively; the language is
byzantine, in comparison with, say, Chapman or Jonson, and much of it is in
verse.  The plot includes a bed-trick which, if realistic, requires that Angelo
and Mariana not speak during the big night and that the two women look very
much alike.
 
I would certainly argue that Shakespeare would have acted in a performance that
ended quickly and solidly.  As Hero shows, silence can be haunting.  But after
reading the responses, I do not think we need to stage it that way now.  I like
the idea of the actors quickly forming a marriage arrangement.  Music starts
and Isabella suddenly walks off in disgust, to the shock of all, like that
actor in New York who quit a play mid-scene because he was experiencing real
violence with no protection from the director; he literally hopped off the
stage and walked up the aisle.  You see, I don't mind adding realism to
Shakespeare occasionally, I just want us to be conscious that we are adding it.
 

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