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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Killing Duncan; Africans in London: *MM* Ending
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0237.  Wednesday, 22 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Scott Shepherd <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 12:05:30 -0500
        Subj:   Killing Duncan
 
(2)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 15:23:02 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0233.  Africans in London
 
(3)     From:   Milla Riggio <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 01:03:37 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0231  Re: *MM* Ending
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 12:05:30 -0500
Subject:        Killing Duncan
 
Did Don Foster really mean it, that "sticking a knife in the king's body" is a
noningredient in Macbeth's horror? What happened to
 
>that suggestion
>whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
>and makes my seated heart knock at my ribs
>against the use of nature
 
and
 
>let that be
>which the eye fears, when it is done, to see
 
not to mention "the horrid deed" and "this terrible feat"? These I guess he
overlooked in pursuit of his particular interpretation.
 
A Macbeth wriggling in Time's fist, appalled to find himself the plaything of
ordained destiny, such a Macbeth materializes sometime after the king is
killed, but if you look for him too insistently in act 1 where he only
embryonically exists, you escort yourself toward preposterous conclusions like
this one: the dagger soliloquy (if I understand Don Foster right) is Macbeth
assuring himself that the assassination is his own doing, not fate's.
 
Precisely the reverse is true! He does nothing in that speech but shift the
responsibility to external forces--to the dagger, to night, to nature itself,
and to the bell that invites him to his crime and summons his victim to death.
The entire cosmos marshalling his way, _that_ notion encourages him to act.
Which of course exactly contradicts Mr Foster's main premise.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 15:23:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0233.  Africans in London
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0233.  Africans in London
 
Probably Gabriel Egan and Anna Cole do not wish to suggest that sixteenth and
early seventeenth century Africans in London could not learn to read. But the
implication seems to be there -- to my eye. How do people who have had little
or no formal education learn to read? Why not Africans? In fact, if you had an
African servant in Renaissance London, it might be in your best interest to
teach him how to read -- depending on what services he was performing for you.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 01:03:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0231  Re: *MM* Ending
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0231  Re: *MM* Ending
 
A follow-up note:  I should mention that Scott Crider, University of Dallas,
has written a paper entitled "Performing Silence: Interpreting Isabella in Act
5 of MEASURE FOR MEASURE" for my SAA seminar.  We will be discussing Scott's
paper along with others this coming Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at the Drake Hotel in
Chicago.  The seminar is entitled "From Page to Stage and Back Again: Teaching
and Interpreting Shakespeare through Performance." The seminar will be preceded
by a panel entitled "A Director's Forum," in which Mark Lamos, artistic
director of the Hartford Stage Company, and Joanne Akalaitis will discuss their
experiences as directors of Shakespeare All are invited to the panel and
interested persons welcomed as auditors at the seminar.  (The panel is an open
panel, provided as a plenary panel for the conference, not limited in any way
to the seminar, though organized in conjunction with it.  Please do come to the
panel if you're in Chicago for the SAA.)
 
Milla Riggio
 

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