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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Hamlet's Nutshell and Bartlett's
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0241.  Friday, 24 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Peter Scott <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 09:59:29 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   Bartlett's
 
(2)     From:   John Cox <COX@HOPE.BITNET>
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 12:43:07 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0238  Q: Hamlet's "I could . . ."
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Scott <
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Date:           Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 09:59:29 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Bartlett's
 
You might want to look at this. Has a Shakespeare section.
 
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, 9th Ed. Columbia University, New York, NY, US
 
This is the original classic scholarly collection of quotations by the great
editor John Bartlett. Browse or search 9,000 quotations and 2,000 footnotes by
over 400 authors.
 
     Published by Columbia University's Project Bartleby.
     http://www.columbia.edu/~svl2/bartlett/
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Cox <COX@HOPE.BITNET>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 12:43:07 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0238  Q: Hamlet's "I could . . ."
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0238  Q: Hamlet's "I could . . ."
 
Regarding Antoine Goulem's question about Hamlet's being bounded by a nutshell
(etc), I can't think of a specific reference or analogue for that image, but it
might be helpful to know that what Hamlet himself is glossing (namely, "for
there is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so") is not a
statement of despairing relativism--or not necessarily so.  It has a possible
precedent in Boethius's *Consolation of Philosophy* II.Prose iv: "Nothing is
miserable unless you think it so."  Chaucer's "no man is wreched but himself it
wene" ("Ballade of Fortune") almost certainly comes from Boethius.
 
John Cox
Hope College
 

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