Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: March ::
Re: Reading Clues in the Verse
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0246.  Monday, 27 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 26 Mar 1995 19:19:40 +0100
        Subj:   RE: Phrasing, Caesura, and Run-on Lines
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Sunday, 26 Mar 1995 13:27:55 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0244
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 26 Mar 1995 19:19:40 +0100
Subject:        RE: Phrasing, Caesura, and Run-on Lines
 
I don't think much can be determined of Shakespeare's intention concerning the
speaking of lines from the punctuation in a play like WT. The King's Men's
scribe Ralph Crane, when preparing copy for the printers of the Folio, changed
punctuation quite freely and idiosyncratically. T H Howard Hill showed the
Crane frequently altered commas in his source to colons, and one of the
compositors occasionally changed them back whilst the other did not.
 
Gabriel Egan

 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Sunday, 26 Mar 1995 13:27:55 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0244
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0244
 
About caesurae.  I've noticed an awful lot in Shakespeare's verse as well.  Do
you think it might have to do with the tradition from which he's writing?  I
mean, caesurae are extremely important in OE, and have a resurgence in middle
English, as well.  They're among the few peices of punctuation in Chaucer
manuscripts, for instance.
 
Paul Fussell, somewhere or other, comments that iambic pentameter continues to
influence experimental efforts at quantitative verse.  Might the heavy
importance of caesurae in Shakespeare show the continuing influence of an OE
(or ME) alliterative line?  In other words, could the older half-line be as
important to Shakespeare as the newer Marlovian iambic pentameter?
 
Just a thought.  I'm interested in what others might think.
 
Cheers,
Sean.
 

Other Messages In This Thread

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.