1995

Shenandoah Shakespeare Express; Q: Hamlet's "I could

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0238.  Wednesday, 22 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Patty Kloss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 14:45:40 -0500
        Subj:   Shenandoah Shakespeare Express!!
 
(2)     From:   Antoine Goulem <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 07:55:12 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patty Kloss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 14:45:40 -0500
Subject:        Shenandoah Shakespeare Express!!
 
The Shenandoah Shakespeare Express will be touring throughout the Mid-West and
New England during Fall of '95.
 
I still have some dates available for performances and workshops and will send
booking info (or tour schedules) to whomever requests. Dates available include:
Sept. 19-26 Mid-West (WI,IL,IN,OH) and Oct 2-5 and 9-10 New England (NY State,
VT, NH, ME, ONT-CAN) We are touring Hamlet,The Tempest, Twelfth Night and
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.  You and/or your school would choose any
(or all).
 
Sound like fun? It is!
 
E-mail or call me at (703) 434-3366
 
Patty Kloss
Booking Coordinator
Shenandoah Shakespeare Express
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Antoine Goulem <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 07:55:12 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Hamlet
 
I would very much appreciate any information that anyone might have concerning
Hamlet's line "I could be bounded in a nutshell and count myself king of
infinite space were it not that I have dreams". I'm citing from memory, so I
may have made some mistakes, but I think the line is recognizable. I'm
particularily interested in relating that line to philosophical views of
Shakespeare's day, concerning space, the infinite and subjectivity.
 
Antoine Goulem  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Re: Killing Duncan; Africans in London: *MM* Ending

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0237.  Wednesday, 22 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 12:05:30 -0500
        Subj:   Killing Duncan
 
(2)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 15:23:02 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0233.  Africans in London
 
(3)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 01:03:37 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0231  Re: *MM* Ending
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Scott Shepherd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 12:05:30 -0500
Subject:        Killing Duncan
 
Did Don Foster really mean it, that "sticking a knife in the king's body" is a
noningredient in Macbeth's horror? What happened to
 
>that suggestion
>whose horrid image doth unfix my hair
>and makes my seated heart knock at my ribs
>against the use of nature
 
and
 
>let that be
>which the eye fears, when it is done, to see
 
not to mention "the horrid deed" and "this terrible feat"? These I guess he
overlooked in pursuit of his particular interpretation.
 
A Macbeth wriggling in Time's fist, appalled to find himself the plaything of
ordained destiny, such a Macbeth materializes sometime after the king is
killed, but if you look for him too insistently in act 1 where he only
embryonically exists, you escort yourself toward preposterous conclusions like
this one: the dagger soliloquy (if I understand Don Foster right) is Macbeth
assuring himself that the assassination is his own doing, not fate's.
 
Precisely the reverse is true! He does nothing in that speech but shift the
responsibility to external forces--to the dagger, to night, to nature itself,
and to the bell that invites him to his crime and summons his victim to death.
The entire cosmos marshalling his way, _that_ notion encourages him to act.
Which of course exactly contradicts Mr Foster's main premise.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 15:23:02 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0233.  Africans in London
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0233.  Africans in London
 
Probably Gabriel Egan and Anna Cole do not wish to suggest that sixteenth and
early seventeenth century Africans in London could not learn to read. But the
implication seems to be there -- to my eye. How do people who have had little
or no formal education learn to read? Why not Africans? In fact, if you had an
African servant in Renaissance London, it might be in your best interest to
teach him how to read -- depending on what services he was performing for you.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 01:03:37 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0231  Re: *MM* Ending
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0231  Re: *MM* Ending
 
A follow-up note:  I should mention that Scott Crider, University of Dallas,
has written a paper entitled "Performing Silence: Interpreting Isabella in Act
5 of MEASURE FOR MEASURE" for my SAA seminar.  We will be discussing Scott's
paper along with others this coming Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at the Drake Hotel in
Chicago.  The seminar is entitled "From Page to Stage and Back Again: Teaching
and Interpreting Shakespeare through Performance." The seminar will be preceded
by a panel entitled "A Director's Forum," in which Mark Lamos, artistic
director of the Hartford Stage Company, and Joanne Akalaitis will discuss their
experiences as directors of Shakespeare All are invited to the panel and
interested persons welcomed as auditors at the seminar.  (The panel is an open
panel, provided as a plenary panel for the conference, not limited in any way
to the seminar, though organized in conjunction with it.  Please do come to the
panel if you're in Chicago for the SAA.)
 
Milla Riggio

Shakespearean Anagrams

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0235.  Tuesday, 21 March 1995.
 
From:           Dave Beenken <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 20 Mar 1995 19:51:27 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        Shakespearean anagrams!
 
--Maybe not appropriate for this prestigious list, but these *anagrams*
of 'William Shakespeare' appeared in the _Minneaoplis Star Tribune_
(in I forget what context) not long ago. I thought them not only
enjoyable, but quite good!
 
                        WE ALL MAKE HIS PRAISE.
                        I SWEAR HE'S LIKE A LAMP.
                        "HAS WILL A PEER?" I ASK ME.
                        AH, I SPEAK A SWELL RIME.
 
Ciao, Dave

Re: Shakespearean Anagrams

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0236.  Wednesday, 22 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Ton Hoenselaars <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 20:34:28 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0235  Shakespearean Anagrams
 
(2)     From:   David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 18:16:13 -0600
        Subj:   Re: Shakespearean Anagrams
 
(3)     From:   Alistair Scott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 15:35:52 +0100
        Subj:   Shakespearean Anagrams
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ton Hoenselaars <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 20:34:28 -0600 (CST)
Subject: 6.0235  Shakespearean Anagrams
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0235  Shakespearean Anagrams
 
I much enjoyed Dave Beenken's contribution on the Shakespearean Anagrams.
Although I am not Lacanian enough to appreciate the true seriousness of the
results, I would be interested to know if further Anagram lists exist for the
Complete Works. Also, I hope that most (if not all) of the renderings *dans le
desordre* will at least be of the Telmah Hawkes calibre.
 
Sincerely,
Ton Hoenselaars
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Kathman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Mar 1995 18:16:13 -0600
Subject:        Re: Shakespearean Anagrams
 
>--Maybe not appropriate for this prestigious list, but these *anagrams*
>of 'William Shakespeare' appeared in the _Minneaoplis Star Tribune_
>(in I forget what context) not long ago. I thought them not only
>enjoyable, but quite good!
>
>                        WE ALL MAKE HIS PRAISE.
>                        I SWEAR HE'S LIKE A LAMP.
>                        "HAS WILL A PEER?" I ASK ME.
>                        AH, I SPEAK A SWELL RIME.
 
Those are pretty good; I've seen variants of several of them.  Another is:
 
ME, LEAR? SPEAK SWAHILI?
 
Dave Kathman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Alistair Scott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Mar 1995 15:35:52 +0100
Subject:        Shakespearean Anagrams
 
Is this well known by Shakespeare scholars?  Probably, but here goes anyway ...
 
The last two lines of the Epilogue in 'The Tempest':
 
    As you for crimes would pardon'd be,
    Let your indulgence set me free.
 
with the addition of the first and last letters of the word 'anagram' (and
taking 'u' = 'v' twice) can be re-arranged to read:
 
    'Tempest' of Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam.
     Do ye ne'er divulge me ye words.
 
However, I believe that Bacon was not created Lord Verulam until 1618, some
years after The Tempest was written.
 
Amusing nonetheless.
 
Cheers,
Alistair Scott
(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

CFP: CATH '95

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0234.  Tuesday, 21 March 1995.
 
From:           Stuart Lee <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 20 Mar 1995 11:47:54 +0000
Subject:        CFP: CATH '95 (Reminder)
 
***************************************************
CATH '95 (Computers and Teaching in the Humanities)
 
ADVANCE NOTICE and CALL for PAPERS
 
The CATH '95 conference will be held at Royal Holloway, University of London,
Egham, Surrey, from 5th-7th September 1995.
 
The conference is organized by the Office for Humanities Communication and the
Computers in Teaching Initiative Centre for Textual Studies (both at the
University of Oxford), and the English Department, Royal Holloway.
 
The theme of this year's conference is Computers and the Changing Curriculum.
We would like to encourage proposals which include practical experiences of the
use of computers in teaching, and approaches taken by the teacher in
integrating computing into courses, describing problems as well as successes,
plus examples of student feedback. Experiences are sought from a wide mix of
humanities disciplines. Contemporary topics and new developments are always
welcome, for example, use of resources on the Internet.
 
Contributions are invited for individual formal papers (30 minutes inclusive of
10 minute question time), panel sessions comprising three related papers, or
workshops. Workshops should be about 2-hours in length and should involve
hands-on tuition as well as time for discussion; the level of experience aimed
at should be indicated (and may be from novice to more experienced).
 
For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 500 words (500
for each paper in a panel session) no later than April 14th. This should
include a summary paragraph of the main points covered in your paper which will
be used in the programme to describe the session. For workshops, a descriptive
paragraph of aims and means will suffice. The proposals will be refereed by a
programme committee and all authors will be notified of the outcome by early
May. We are also interested in proposals for other forms of presentation such
as poster sessions, and demonstrations at the software fair.
 
Further information including a draft programme and costs is expected to be
available in May. All participants at the CATH '94 conference will be sent
these details.
 
Please submit your proposal by April 14th (also any enquiries) to:
Christine Mullings
Office for Humanities Communication
Oxford University Computing Services
13 Banbury Road
Oxford OX2 6NN
Tel: 01865-273221
Fax: 01865-273221
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Format for submission: paper copy plus copy on 3.5" disk (standard
wordprocessor files or plain ASCII files will be accepted). Electronic
submissions are welcome (plain ASCII files please). Details should include
title of contribution, your full name and contact address, and telephone, fax,
and email address.

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