1995

*Goodnight/Morning*; Violence in Sh; Wilson's Sh Bio

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0218.  Thursday, 16 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 13:02:17 -0500
        Subj:   Goodnight, Desdemona, Good Morning, Juliet
 
(2)     From:   David Evett <R0870%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 17:33 ET
        Subj:   Violence in Sh
 
(3)     From:   David Reinheimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 08:10:52 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Ian Wilson's Biography
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman J. Myers <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 13:02:17 -0500
Subject:        Goodnight, Desdemona, Good Morning, Juliet
 
The Bowling Green State University Theatre Department will be opening its
95-96 season with a production of GOODNIGHT DESDEMONA, GOOD MORNING JULIET
by the Canadian playwright, An Marie MacDonald.  I know that the play was
first produced in Toronto around 1990, and I'm trying to find out if there
have been any productions in the United States.  The Shakespearean
connection is that the main character is trapped in a time warp and is
deposited in the middle of original productions of OTHELLO and R & J.
 
Thanks in advance.  You can reply directly to me unless you think other
SHAKSPERians would be interested.
 
Norman Myers
Bowling Green State University
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Evett <R0870%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 17:33 ET
Subject:        Violence in Sh
 
Students of Shakespeare should read Robert Wright, "The Biology of Violence",
New Yorker 3/13/95 68-77, surveying recent work in evolutionary biology with
particular reference to the human male's disposition toward violence.  The
immediate focus of the article is the inner-city neighborhoods of late C20
North America, but as I read it bells kept ringing in my head--Macbeth, Richard
III, Edmund, Don John; it provides a very stimulating context for "If it be
man's work, I'll do it," and the other statements of that ilk, but also for
hundreds of other speeches and gestures.
 
The prime source for the articles ideas is Martin Daly and Margo Wilson,
_Homicide_ (1988), which I have not read.  I gather that its findings have not
been universally accepted in the relevant scientific and social scientific
disciplines, as might be expected, so would be interested also to hear from
those of you aware of both Daly and Wilson and any relevant skeptics.
 
Homicidally,
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Reinheimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 08:10:52 -0800 (PST)
Subject:        Ian Wilson's Biography
 
My dad just sent me Robert Taylor's review of Ian Wilson's _Shakespeare: the
Evidence_ (Boston Globe, 3/8/95, p. 34), a biography which apparently argues
for Shakespeare the Catholic.  Has anyone read the book and ha ve comments?
 
BTW, a very interesting line in the review: "The research (unusual in a book of
this sort) is up to the minute..."  Hmmmm...
 
Have a good day!
Dave Reinheimer
UCDavis

*Hamlet* Questions

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0217.  Thursday, 16 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Albert Misseldine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 14:05:43 -0500
        Subj:   A Couple of *Hamlet* Questions
 
(2)     From:   Shenandoah Shakespeare Express <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 12:09:10 -0500
        Subj:   Hamlet folk song
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Albert Misseldine <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 14:05:43 -0500
Subject:        A Couple of *Hamlet* Questions
 
There were things I liked about Mel Gibson's *Hamlet*, and the critics treated
it kindly for the most part. But there was one thing that seemed really wrong
to me, and I haven't seen it discussed. (Of course, I may have missed it). When
Hamlet and Laertes fight at the end, they are swinging at each other with
murderous intent, and with broadswords, not rapiers (bated or unbated). Anyway,
the way they were swinging bated or unbated would make no difference. Might as
well bate a battle-ax. And yet they say all the lines, and what a mockery the
fight makes of Hamlet's "These foils have all a length?"
 
Another question, just on *Hamlet*. Are we supposed to accept as plausible
Claudius's confident assurance to Laertes that Gertrude will accept Hamlet 's
death as an accident? What excuse did Claudius have in mind - Laertes (and/or
Osric) didn't notice that the sword was sharp. And how explain the little
matter of the poison, just in case Laertes doesn't get Hamlet through a vital
part, and Hamlet dies of a scratch? Or was Claudius intending to double-cross
Laertes? Or what?
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Shenandoah Shakespeare Express <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 12:09:10 -0500
Subject:        Hamlet folk song
 
Does anyone know who wrote the Hamlet folk song?  We are performing it at the
beginning of our Hamlet and we would love to know the name of the author. Here
are the first lyrics:            "There was a king nodding in his garden all
alone when his brother in his ear poured a little bit of henbane, stole his
brothers crown and his money and his widow, but the dead king walked and got
his son and said listen kiddo ... Hamlet, Hamlet..."  It has a fast tempo, you
have to listen to it several times to understand it all.  We will appreciate
any help we receive on this!  Thanks.
 
[In July of 1993, I posted my transcribed lyrics of the "Three-Minute HAMLET"
(below) At that time, James Schaefer reported hearing the song sung by Michael
Cooney on an old *Prairie Home Companion*, and John Drakakis identified the
author as Glaswegian Adam McNaughton.  Normally, I would use this opportunity
to praise the Database function of LISTSERV, encouraging members to use it to
find the information, but for storage reasons, those logs are not currently
available at the University of Toronto and will not be until our move to Bowie
State.  --HMC
 
PS: Just from the lines produced, I find already one error in transcription,
which I have corrected.]
 
===============================================================================
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 4, No. 422.  Monday, 12 July 1993.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, July 12, 1993
Subject:        "The Three-Minute HAMLET"
 
SHAKSPEReans,
 
To brighten up the summer lull, I'm sending out a transcription of
"The Three-Minute HAMLET," a song recorded by Shamus Kennedy at
Washington, D.C.'s Ireland's Four Provinces.  In the segue, Kennedy
identifies that song as being "written by a Scottish school teacher
of English."  Kennedy goes on to say that the teacher "could never
interest his class in Shakespeare, so he wrote this song to see if
he could get the buggers' attention for at least three minutes."
 
A student of mine gave me a tape of this song last year, so I don't
have any information about the album or the name of the Scottish
school teacher, both of which I would welcome.
 
Any errors in transcribing the lyrics are clearly mine own.  I would
like to thank my daughter Melissa for helping me get the words down.
Her ear and her ability to memorize lines are fair superior to my own,
and I cheerfully acknowledge my debt to her.
 
 
********************************************************************
               The Three-Minute HAMLET
 
There was a king nodding in his garden all alone,
When his brother in his ear poured a little bit of henbane,
Stole his brother's crown and his money and his widow,
But the dead king walked and got his son and said, "Now, listen, Kiddo.
I've been killed and it's your duty to take revenge on Claudius;
Kill him quick and clean; and tell the nation what a fraud he is."
The kid said, "Right, I'll do it, but I'll have to play it crafty,
So no one will suspect me I'll let on that I'm a dafty."
 
So for all except Horatio, and he counts him as a friend,
Hamlet, that's the kid, lets on he's round the bend;
And because he's not yet willing for obligatory killing,
He tries to make his uncle think he's tuppence off the shilling;
Takes a rise out of Polonius; treats poor Ophelia vile;
Tells Rosencrantz and Gildenstern that Denmark's "Bloody vile";
Then a troop of traveling actors, like Seven-Eighty-four,
Arrived to do a special one, that gig at Elsinore.
 
Hamlet, Hamlet, acting balmy.
Hamlet, Hamlet, loves his mommy.
Hamlet, Hamlet, hesitating,
He wonders if the ghost's a fake, and that is why he's waiting.
 
So Hamlet writes a scene for the players to enact,
So Horatio and he could watch and see if Claudius cracked.
The play was called "The Mousetrap," not the one that running now,
And sure enough, the King walked out before the scene was through.
Now, Hamlet's got to prove his uncle gave his dad the dose.
The only trouble being now that Claudius knows he knows.
So while Hamlet tells his mommy her new husband's not a fit man,
Uncle Claud takes out a contract with the English King as hit-man.
 
Hamlet, Hamlet killed Polonius and hid corpus delicti.
'Twas the King's excuse to send him for an English hempen necktie
With Rosencrantz and Gildenstern to make quite sure he got there,
But Hamlet jumped the boat and put the finger straight on that pair.
When Laertes heard his dad's killed in the bedroom by the arras,
He comes running back to Elsinore tout de suite hot-foot from Paris.
And Ophelia with her dad killed by the man she was to marry,
After saying it with flowers, she committed hari-kari.
 
Hamlet, Hamlet, ain't no messin'.
Hamlet, Hamlet, learned his lesson.
Hamlet, Hamlet, Yorrick's trust.
Convinced them all men good or bad at last must come to dust.
 
Then Laertes lost his cool and was demanding retribution.
The King said, "Keep your head, and I'll supply you with solutions."
So he arranged a sword fight for the interested parties
With a blunted sword for Hamlet and a sharp one for Laertes.
And to make double sure that the old-belt-and-brace was limed,
He arranged a poison sword tip and a poisoned cup of wine.
The poison sword got Hamlet but Laertes went and fluffed it
'Cause he got stabbed himself and he confessed before he snuffed it.
Now, Hamlet's mommy drank the wine, and as her face turned blue,
Hamlet said, "I think this King's a baddy through and through."
Well, "Incestuous, murd'rous, damned Dane," he said to be precise
And made up for hesitating once by killing Claudius twice,
'Cause he stabbed him with his knife and forced the wine between his lips,
And he said, "The rest is silence," and he cashed in all his chips;
And they fired a volley over him that shook the top-most rafter;
And Fortinbras, knee-deep in Danes, lived happy ever after.
 
Hamlet, Hamlet, end of story.
Hamlet, Hamlet, very gory.
Hamlet, Hamlet, I'm on my way.
And if you think that was confusing, you should read the bloody play.
From:   MX%"This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it." 15-MAR-1995 13:09:04.85
To:     HMCOOK
CC:
Subj:   Goodnight, Desdemona, Good Morning, Juliet
 
Return-Path: <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Received: from vm.utcc.utoronto.ca (vm2.utcc.utoronto.ca) by boe00.minc.umd.edu
          (MX V3.3 VAX) with SMTP; Wed, 15 Mar 1995 13:09:01 EST
Received: from vm.utcc.utoronto.ca by vm.utcc.utoronto.ca (IBM VM SMTP V2R2)
          with BSMTP id 1015; Wed, 15 Mar 95 13:04:19 EST
Received: from UTORONTO.BITNET by vm.utcc.utoronto.ca (Mailer R2.10 ptf000)
          with BSMTP id 4312; Wed, 15 Mar 95 13:04:17 EST
Received: from PSUVM.PSU.EDU by vm.utcc.utoronto.ca (Mailer R2.10 ptf000) with
          BSMTP id 4306; Wed, 15 Mar 95 13:02:08 EST
Received: from PSUVM (NJE origin SMTP@PSUVM) by PSUVM.PSU.EDU (LMail
          V1.2a/1.8a) with BSMTP id 9654; Wed, 15 Mar 1995 13:02:42 -0500
Received: from falcon.bgsu.edu by PSUVM.PSU.EDU (IBM VM SMTP V2R2) with TCP;
          Wed, 15 Mar 95 13:02:41 EST
Received: from [129.1.251.117] (M251-117.bgsu.edu [129.1.251.117]) by
          falcon.bgsu.edu (8.6.8.1/8.6.6) with SMTP id NAA29901 for
          <SHAKSPER%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>; Wed, 15 Mar 1995 13:02:17
          -0500
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 1995 13:02:17 -0500
Message-ID: <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
To: Shakespeare Electronic Conference
    <SHAKSPER%This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Norman J. Myers)
X-Sender: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (Unverified)
Subject: Goodnight, Desdemona, Good Morning, Juliet
 
The Bowling Green State University Theatre Department will be opening its
95-96 season with a production of GOODNIGHT DESDEMONA, GOOD MORNING JULIET
by the Canadian playwright, An Marie MacDonald.  I know that the play was
first produced in Toronto around 1990, and I'm trying to find out if there
have been any productions in the United States.  The Shakespearean
connection is that the main character is trapped in a time warp and is
deposited in the middle of original productions of OTHELLO and R & J.
 
Thanks in advance.  You can reply directly to me unless you think other
SHAKSPERians would be interested.
 
Norman Myers
Professor, Theatre
Bowling Green State University
Bowling Green, Ohio 43403
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Marston Opportunity; South Carolina Doings

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0215.  Thursday, 16 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   T. Fred Wharton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 95 11:37:00 EST
        Subj:   Marston opportunity
 
(2)     From:   Chris Fassler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 16:46:46 -0500
        Subj:   South Carolina doings
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           T. Fred Wharton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 95 11:37:00 EST
Subject:        Marston opportunity
 
Following on my book, *The Critical Fall and Rise of John Marston,* I'm now
working on an edition of new essays on John Marston's plays for Cambridge
University Press, timed to coincide with the fourth centenary of his debut as a
dramatist.
 
Almost all of the contributors are already set, but our CUP editor would like
perhaps two more essays in the volume. If anyone is currently working on
Marston's plays, particularly from a New Historicist perspective, I would be
interested in hearing about your work.
 
Responses, please, to:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Fred Wharton
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Chris Fassler <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 16:46:46 -0500
Subject:        South Carolina doings
 
Colleagues,
 
FYI:  Today I learned (via e-mail) that 38 South Carolina legislators have
co-signed a bill to prohibit public institutions from granting tenure to
non-tenured faculty and to require that an alternative to tenure be devised for
all tenured faculty.  (I will provide a complete text of the bill, which was
abundantly clear, if interest warrants it.)
 
Whatever may ail tenure as a system of protecting intellectual freedom, this a
ction seems an outrageously inappropriate treatment. Even as a non-tenured,
non-tenure-track, part-time faculty member, I am  distressed that a legislative
body might even discuss such a radically draconian measure.
 
Watch the skies!
 
--Chris Fassler
  Winthrop University

Re: Africans in London; Picard's Sh; Hero; Characters

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0216.  Thursday, 16 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Anthony Martin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 12:30:28 +0900
        Subj:   Africans in Shakespeare's London
 
(2)     From:   Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 14:01:19 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   J-L Picard's Shakespeare edition
 
(3)     From:   Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 16:47:42 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0202  Re: Hero
 
(4)     From:   Michael Saenger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 18:09:52 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Characters (Was *MM* Ending)
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Anthony Martin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 12:30:28 +0900
Subject:        Africans in Shakespeare's London
 
Eldred Jones (_Othello's Countrymen_) refers to research by W. E. Miller, who
found four Negroes to be living in the one parish of All Hallows in 1599, and
to the state order for the expulsion of the *great number of Negars and
blackamoors* in 1601. There is also some research by Leslie Hotson on this
matter, but I have mislaid the reference.
 
It is therefore possible, though still unlikely, that Africans were in some way
involved with the theatre at the time.
 
Anthony Martin
Waseda University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Douglas M Lanier <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 14:01:19 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        J-L Picard's Shakespeare edition
 
My understanding is that the edition displayed in Picard's office on the Star
Trek:  The Next Generation show and in the movie Generations is the Globe
Illustrated edition.  I am told by fans that the staff took great pride in
changing the pages of the edition for each show.
 
Since inquiring minds want to know,
Doug Lanier
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Friedman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 16:47:42 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0202  Re: Hero
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0202  Re: Hero
 
Just to offer an alternative that no one else has put forward yet, why not
explore the possibility that Hero is marrying Claudio as much to please her
father as she is because she loves the young Count?  In 2.1, she acquiesces to
Leonato's request that she marry Don Pedro ("If the Prince do solicit you in
that kind, you know your answer"), and the text never shows her speaking her
love for Claudio aloud, aside from the phrase, "my dear Claudio" in 3.1.  It
has always seemed significant to me that Hero faints, according to the text,
right after Leonato's exclamation, "Hath no man's dagger here a point for me?"
the first time that he shows that he believes the accusations against her are
true.  Although many productions rearrange the text to imply that Hero's faint
occurs in response to Claudio's exit (and therefore as a climax to his
abandonment of her), I would find it interesting to see a Hero faint in such a
way that it says to us, "What?  After all I've done to try to please you,
Father, even you doubt my chastity?"
 
                                                Michael Friedman
                                                University of Scranton
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Michael Saenger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 18:09:52 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Characters (Was *MM* Ending)
 
Several people responded negatively to my post regarding plays being fictions.
Throughout history, lovers of Shakespeare have praised him for being like them.
Now it is popular to say that he is a realist, which has much more to do with
the 20th century than the 17th.  Look at the play objectively; the language is
byzantine, in comparison with, say, Chapman or Jonson, and much of it is in
verse.  The plot includes a bed-trick which, if realistic, requires that Angelo
and Mariana not speak during the big night and that the two women look very
much alike.
 
I would certainly argue that Shakespeare would have acted in a performance that
ended quickly and solidly.  As Hero shows, silence can be haunting.  But after
reading the responses, I do not think we need to stage it that way now.  I like
the idea of the actors quickly forming a marriage arrangement.  Music starts
and Isabella suddenly walks off in disgust, to the shock of all, like that
actor in New York who quit a play mid-scene because he was experiencing real
violence with no protection from the director; he literally hopped off the
stage and walked up the aisle.  You see, I don't mind adding realism to
Shakespeare occasionally, I just want us to be conscious that we are adding it.

Yesterday's Digests

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0214.  Thursday, 16 March 1995.
 
From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, March 16, 1995
Subject:        Yesterday's Digests
 
There seems to have been a problem yesterday with the distribution of the
Wednesday digests to some of you, especially members in the UK.  Other lists
encountered the same difficulty.  I have decided to include below the two
digests I mailed out yesterday for those who may have missed them.
 
===============================================================================
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0212.  Wednesday, 15 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:58:13 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0208  Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
(2)     From:   Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:59:14 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
(3)     From:   David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 10:32:59 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:58:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0208  Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0208  Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
The address is:
 
                Folio Scripts
                2515 Caledonia Avenue
                Deep Cove
                District of North Vancouver
                British Columbia
                Canada  V7G 1T8
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sean Lawrence <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:59:14 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
Since I'm taking a course with Neil Freeman at the moment, specifically on the
use of early texts in acting, I thought I'd reply to the query regarding the
Folio Scripts.  The address at the back of my text is 2515 Caledonia Avenue,
Deep Cove, District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V7G 1T8, or
telephone 1-604-924-1401.  Yes, he has done a _Winter's Tale_.  The hard copy
is $20.00 including tax, and a Mac disk version is $50.00, which you can edit
down to a working text more easily.
 
BTW, there's also a companion volume (also privately printed--apparently
someone wanted a lot of copies in a hurry) called _Shakespeare's First Texts_
and costing $22.50.  It's what we're working through in class. The study is
rather intriguing, using the early punctuation, etc., as guides to
pronunciation, often linking them closely with Elizabethan rhetorical style, as
well as modern acting method.  This may seem like a contradiction, but it works
in practice, which is the acid test.
 
The Folio text of _Hamlet_ was used for the Winnipeg production, reviewed
extensively on this list a short while ago.
 
Cheers,
Sean.
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David M Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 10:32:59 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0208 Re: Freeman's *Scripts*
 
This is in response to Skip Shand's useful and informative posting on Freeman's
*Scripts.*
 
While I have not yet made use of these myself, I have done what is perhaps the
next best thing--videlicet:  I have based performances I have worked on for the
last several years on the Oxford Text Archive Folio and Quarto texts.  I have
modernized *some* spelling, but have preserved punctuation (quite useful--with
Skip Shand's caveats) capitalization, and versification.  A sense of short
lines, Hamlet's "no", or Helena's "Yes, faith" is enormously useful--essential,
I would say.
 
I have detected a tendency (perhaps my own paranoia) to elevate one early text
over another.  (Canonize the Folio over the Quarto, or vice versa.) The real
usefulness of Oxford Text Archive is that it gives you both texts, Q and F.
You may choose, for example, to include or cut Lear's mock trial or Hamlet's
"How all occasions" soliloquy--to give the two most controversial examples.  If
You were consulting only the Folio texts, you would not have such choices.  In
sum, the early texts remain live, essential sources for performers and
directors, as well as for scholars and editors.  Let us be grateful that such
texts are so much more readily available than they were ten or fifteen years
ago.
 
David Richman
University of New Hampshire
 
===============================================================================
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0213.  Wednesday, 15 March 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Melissa Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:12:12 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0207 Re: Hero
 
(2)     From:   Diane Mountford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 01:33:24 -0500
        Subj:   Re: The Problem of Hero
 
(3)     From:   Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 14:04:23 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   RE: SHK 6.0206  Re: *MM* Ending;
 
(4)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 21:52:34 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0206 Characters and Imagination
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Melissa Aaron <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 09:12:12 +0200
Subject: 6.0207 Re: Hero
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0207 Re: Hero
 
I'm not sure that a swoon is so easily read as a defense.  It could just as
easily be read as an admission of guilt.  So is her blushing.  Claudio insists
that "her blush is guiltiness, not modesty," and all the other "exterior
shows."  (Back to Desdemona.  Her chastity is an essence that's not seen.)  As
far as playing on the Globe stage, chances are the audience couldn't see a
blush even if the actor could have called one up on command.
 
It's not so much that the audience trusts the Friar's noting, IMHO (Friar
Lawrence?  The Duke as Friar?)  It's that the audience heard the villains
plotting.  Without that simple plot directive, there is nothing *in the
playtext* that Hero says or does which, theoretically, could not be interpreted
to her discredit, until after the Prince and Claudio have left.
 
Flame-proof suit on,
Melissa Aaron
University of Wisconsin-Madison
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Diane Mountford <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 15 Mar 1995 01:33:24 -0500
Subject:        Re: The Problem of Hero
 
Sarah,
 
Here's my two cents about Hero.  Hope you find it thought-provoking if not
useful.
 
I find Hero fascinating because I think she changes more than anyone else in
the play. Sure Beatrice & Benedick stop lying to themselves about their
feelings, but Hero really goes through fire. I once heard an interview with
Laura Dern in which she described David Lynch's view of innocence. In Lynch's
world, innocence has nothing to do with naivete, but rather is an outlook
chosen and maintained through knowledge and against great odds.  I think Hero
takes Claudio back not because she's co-dependent or spineless, but because she
has come to understand suffering and makes the conscious choice for innocence.
 
As for the night before the wedding, my theory is that in the afternoon someone
told her about sex for the first time, and she's terrified! She might send
Beatrice away so that she can cry all night . . . or at least think it over.
 
And as for the much-pondered-over silence at the wedding, I think shock is very
playable. And indignant pride. In any case, finding words (especially if you're
an objectified Renaissance woman) in the face of unmitigated rage is never
easy.
 
Best wishes in crafting your own personal interpretation.  Let us know how it
goes.
 
-- Diane Mountford   <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Al Cacicedo <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 14:04:23 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0206  Re: *MM* Ending;
Comment:        RE: SHK 6.0206  Re: *MM* Ending;
 
Of course characters in plays are mere words, words, words with no existence
outside those words.  To paraphrase Howard Cossell, when *MM* ends, the future
is behind the characters.  However, it is downright silly to suppose that an
audience, certainly now and probably in 1600, will stop considering characters
as soon as a play comes to its end.  If there *is* an irony in the notion that
"all is well that ends well," isn't the irony based at least in part on
conjectures about the non-existent future of the non-people whose non-lives
have been presented on stage?
 
Just a thought,
Al Cacicedo
Albright College
 
(4)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Mar 1995 21:52:34 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0206 Characters and Imagination
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0206 Characters and Imagination
 
Michael Saenger reminds us that the Duke and Isabella are characters in a play,
and, thus, they are not real people with pasts, futures, and realistic
emotions. I certainly agree -- in part. Of course characters are not real
people, though the characters are played, acted by real people. But when I go
to a play, I give my imagination full sway, and I pretend that I'm watching
real people (as indeed I am) with real emotions. I flirt with the idea that
these characters have a future beyond the script.  And, believe it or not, no
one can stop me from imagining a future for these imaginary people, the Duke
and Isabella -- just as no one can stop Terence Hawkes from seeing these same
characters in political terms.
 
And I imagine that, when Isabella finally gets the Duke's drift, she looks at
him with growing horror -- and flees back to the comfort of the poor Clares.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.