1995

Qs: PC and Productions; Textbooks; Macready's Hamlet

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0349.  Friday, 28 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Ian Doescher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 08:58:52 -0700
        Subj:   Racism, sexism in "Merchant," "Taming"
 
(2)     From:   Gayle Gaskill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 20:18:22 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Advice on Textbooks
 
(3)     From:   Paul Alan Macdonald <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Apr 1995 13:57:51 -0400 (AST)
        Subj:   Macready's Hamlet
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ian Doescher <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 08:58:52 -0700
Subject:        Racism, sexism in "Merchant," "Taming"
 
In our politically correct society, how ought directors or performers deal with
the issues of racism and sexism in "Merchant of Venice" and "Taming of the
Shrew?"  Quite clearly, the racism against Shylock must be dealt with in order
to be appropriate for modern audiences, as well as the inherent sexist
attitudes towards Kate.  Should directors nowadays concern themselves with
making their productions point out the negativity of racism and sexism?  Or is
it not a director's responsibility to be sensitive to an audience?
 
Just wondering.
Ian Doescher
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gayle Gaskill <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 20:18:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Advice on Textbooks
 
I'd welcome advice for choosing texts for two of my classes next year:
 
1.  The Bible in literture.
2.  The Age of Elizabeth: Politics and Literature in the Reign of Elizabeth I.
And does anyone know how to get the videos of the _Elizabeth R_ series Glenda
Jackson did for--I suppose the BBC, which Masterpiece Theatre played years ago?
And could students bear to watch thoee videos in 1996?
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Paul Alan Macdonald <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Apr 1995 13:57:51 -0400 (AST)
Subject:        Macready's Hamlet
 
Hello Everyone:
 
This is my first time posting here, so a great big HELLO to all you
SHAKESPEARians out there. Presently, I'm doing my graduate work on the Play
Scene in "Hamlet", with the main focus being on its presentation by Macready,
Irving, and Beerbohm-Tree.
 
The Macready section is proving to be a little tricky, however, in that I am
looking at his 1838 "Hamlet" at Covent Garden and cannot find any critical
reviews of the production (with the exception of a short article in
"Spectator", Vol. XI). I've seen his diaries and most of the scholarly books
that cover his career, but none of them address this particular production in
any detail. Does anyone have any suggestions? I would really be interested in
reviews that are contemporary to the production, especially if  they discuss
the set, props, staging etc (Clarkson Stanfield was the set designer).
 
Also, there was a series of sketches done on the productions at Covant Garden
during the 1838/39 season by George Scharf and I would love to get some info on
him and his work.
 
If you have any ideas and/or questions, please feel free to E-Mail me directly.
 
Thanks in advance,
paul

Fahrenheit on WWW; ACTER Opening

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0348.  Friday, 28 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Peter Scott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 10:19:55 -0600 (CST)
        Subj:   FAHRENHEIT Theatre Company
 
(2)     From:   Cynthia Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 15:47:32 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   ACTER opening
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Scott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 10:19:55 -0600 (CST)
Subject:        FAHRENHEIT Theatre Company
 
Cincinnati's only professional theatre specializing in the classics!
 
http://iac.net:80/~marjason/
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cynthia Dessen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 15:47:32 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        ACTER opening
 
Clemson University wants to host ACTER's Macbeth production for their
Shakespeare Festival March 12-13, 1996 and they are looking for a school nearby
to share the week residency. If you would like to have ACTER visit your school
Friday-Saturday March 15-16 for one full performance of Macbeth, l or 2 one
person shows (titles to be decided), a day of teaching and some Saturday
workshops (for public or perhaps high school teachers), let me know. It is a
good way to sample ACTER's offerings and would be half price. Contact
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. off list if you are interested.

Re: Music for *Julius Caesar*

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0346.  Friday, 28 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Doug Cummings <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 17:23:07 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0344 Qs: *Julius Caesar*
 
(2)     From:   Heather Stephenson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 19:50:11 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: Julius Caesar Music
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Doug Cummings <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 17:23:07 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: 6.0344 Qs: *Julius Caesar*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0344 Qs: *Julius Caesar*
 
Given the time period you are thinking about, try some of the work of the
Kronos Quartet.  Their music is very modern and exciting.  It is some of
the most interesting contemporary instrumental music around.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Heather Stephenson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 19:50:11 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Re: Julius Caesar Music
 
For a staging of JC set in 2015...
 
If you are feeling a little funky, you might want to try something like DEEP
BREAKFAST, by Ray Lynch.  Celestial Soda Pop, Tiny Geometries and Dancing in
the Pews are all songs that are synthesizer composed, but have background
strings and woodwinds.  Lynch has a few albums out, but (IMHO) Deep Breakfast
is the best.
 
Good Luck!
Heather Stephenson
Georgetown University

Re: *Ham.* Query; New *Othello* Film

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0347.  Friday, 28 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Skip Shand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 10:58:01 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0344  Qs: *Hamlet*
 
(2)     From:   Ellen Edgerton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 28 Apr 95 09:23 EDT
        Subj:   Re: new *Othello* film
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Skip Shand <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 10:58:01 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0344  Qs: *Hamlet*
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0344  Qs: *Hamlet*
 
Re *Hamlet* query:
 
Frye, Roland, *The Renaissance Hamlet*
Colie, Rosalie, *Paradoxia Epidemica*
MacDonald, Michael, and Terence Murphy, *Sleepless Souls*
Shand, G. B. (unblushingly!), "Realising Gertrude: The Suicide Option,"
        *Elizabethan Theatre XIII* (1994)
 
Good luck.
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ellen Edgerton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 28 Apr 95 09:23 EDT
Subject:        Re: new *Othello* film
 
There is conflicting information about this new film version of *Othello*; some
sources (such as this week's TIME magazine) say it is to be directed by Kenneth
Branagh; others (such as VARIETY) say that the director will be Oliver Parker
(who also adapted the screenplay).  The only thing that seems clear is that
Branagh is going to play Iago, Fishburne will play Othello, and the film will
be partially bankrolled by Branagh's production company.
 
Also, I believe that the McKellen *Richard III* is going to start filming next
month.
 
  Ellen Edgerton
  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Cleopatra and Dollabella

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0345.  Friday, 28 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 11:59:02 -0400
        Subj:   Cleopatra & Dollabella
 
(2)     From:   W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 16:30:18 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0342  Deaths of Cleopatra and Antony
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jean Peterson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 11:59:02 -0400
Subject:        Cleopatra & Dollabella
 
I'm with Alistair Scott on this one.  (e.g."Cleopatra was pushed toward suicide
by Dolabella acting as Caesar's agent"--NOT!)
 
I've always assumed that the dramatic purpose of Cleo's conversation with
Dollabella was twofold: to provide an auditor for the great "Emperor Antony"
set-piece (why, in this over-populated play, introduce an entirely NEW
character for this? a question to be asked), and to demonstrate that the ol'
girl hasn't lost her touch--she can still snare and enchant Romans, still make
them betray their political-militaristic-masculine loyalties. Was it Phyllis
Rackin (probably) who pointed out that Dol. sells out his leader and countryman
on the basis of a single conversation with the Queen? At any rate, Dol. tells
her what confirms her decision to suicide: "He'll lead me, then, in
triumph?"--exactly the information Caesar is trying to keep from her.
Egyptians, 10; Romans, 0!
 
Jean Peterson
Bucknell University
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W.L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 27 Apr 1995 16:30:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0342  Deaths of Cleopatra and Antony
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0342  Deaths of Cleopatra and Antony
 
In response to Chris Stroffolino, yes, I must admit that Cleopatra does say
that she will commit suicide before she meets Doladella, but I point out
that Dolabella gives her the information that pushes her over the edge; he
tells her that Caesar intends to take her to Rome and that she has a limited
time in which to commit suicide. I'm not saying that Dolabella controls her
actions, but I do believe that he convinces her to act. And, yes, she does
seem to be wavering in her last scene. The Seleucus episode may be seen as a
trial of Caesar's possible infatuation with her (or if you will, a smoke
screen to convince him that she's not going to commit suicide). Would she
have acted so decisively if Dolabella hadn't given her the nudge?
 
In response to Chris Couche, please, let me have a little mystery in all
this! Bevington in this case is wrong. Please, Chris, give my position a
chance, and check the scene as it appears in the Folio. If you check
Bevington's edited scene with the Folio scene, you will see what I mean.
Dolabella does NOT leave before news of Antony's death is delivered to
Caesar. Bevington, like other editors, changes Dolabella's role, and then
rationalizes the change.
 
If Dolabella's mission is secret (he's one of Caesar's secret agents in my
production), then his mission is not public. Caesar does not want to appear
in this. Publicly he wants his wealthy supporters to believe that he wishes
to take Cleopatra back to Rome alive. Caesar is a generous conqueror, etc.
Privately, he knows that she must die, and suicide would be best for his
public image.
 
Also Caesar tells Cleopatra that, if she commits suicide, he will NOT
protect Caesarion -- who is the genetic son of Julius Caesar -- a definite
threat. Historically, we know that Caesarion "disappears." Cleopatra's
suicide gives Caesar -- in this play -- the excuse he genuinely wishes to
rid himself of the Egyptian royal family.
 
As I suggested earlier, you may wish to compare Queen Elizabeth's charade
when she had Mary, Queen of Scots, executed. Elizabeth wanted the execution
done, but she did not want to appear in the act. Shakespeare had ample
historical precedence for giving Caesar both private motives and public
motives that are at variance with each other.
 
Cleopatra and Caesar use Antony as a tool until he is no longer useful.
Cleopatra then encourages him to commit suicide -- and he does. After his
death, Cleo and Caesar face off -- and she blinks.
 
I realize that this is a "paranoid" interpretation of Cleopatra's suicide.
But, unfortunately, like many obsessed people, I'm convinced by the scenerio
that I give you above.

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