1995

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0259.  Saturday, 1 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Sarah Cave <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 1995 10:57:45 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0253  Re: Stage Blood
 
(2)     From:   Jenise Williamson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 30 Mar 1995 14:20:40 EST
        Subj:   Early Modern Subjectivity
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sarah Cave <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 1995 10:57:45 EST
Subject: 6.0253  Re: Stage Blood
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0253  Re: Stage Blood
 
As one who has had to hold stage blood in my mouth, I agree with the Karo
syrup, red AND blue food coloring idea, but adding a drop of peppermint oil
certainly made it more pleasant!
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jenise Williamson <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Mar 1995 14:20:40 EST
Subject:        Early Modern Subjectivity
 
I hope this gets to you all as this is my first response to an conference
inquiry.
 
An article published in 1993 entitled "Holy Hatred..." deals with subjectivity
of early Modern England as background to a understanding the works of Lady
Eleanor Davies Douglas who self-published between 1625 and 1652. This author
has become my small corner although I can't remember the author of the article.
With the title and some variation of Eleanor's name, anyone could easily
locate an exact reference through the MLA bibliography.
 
Basically, the article deals with the struggle of individual versus societal
responsibility as depicted in Calvinist writings by men and Lady Eleanor, one
of the few women Calvinist writers.  She's got a fascinating twist on the
writer as persona/narrator and subject for her own texts.  Additionally,
Eleanor addresses the place of the individual within governmental and religious
regulation.
 
Best,
Jenise
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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