1995

Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0260.  Sunday, 2 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 01 Apr 95 14:24:00 GMT
        Subj:   SHK 6.0248 Q: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
(2)     From:   Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 01 Apr 1995 08:44:13 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 6.0259  Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
(3)     From:   W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 01 Apr 1995 11:46:16 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 01 Apr 95 14:24:00 GMT
Subject: Q: Early Modern Subjectivity
Comment:        SHK 6.0248 Q: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
Hard luck Bill,
 
Sounds like you asked the wrong people!  When I've slept off my jet lag I'll
put you in the picture.
 
Best wishes,
John Drakakis
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Milla Riggio <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 01 Apr 1995 08:44:13 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 6.0259  Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
Comment:        Re: SHK 6.0259  Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
I believe the article to which Jenise Williamson referred is the following:
 
Megan Matchinske
"Holy Hatred: Formations of the Gendered Subject in English Apocalyptic
     Writing, 1625-1651," ELH 60.2 (summer 1993), 349-378.
 
Best,
Milla Riggio
 
(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           W. L. Godshalk <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 01 Apr 1995 11:46:16 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Re: Early Modern Subjectivity
 
Constructivism seems to be the name of our game, and I wish to thank all those
who responded generously, promptly, and completely. I gather that the position
outlined is a strong one, and we are not merely talking about the idea that one
cannot transcend one's historical moment. Constructivism, I take it, is
cultural determinism.
 
May I ask a few more questions?
 
(1) What is the relationship of constructivism to the Cognitive Revolution? On
the surface, constructivism seems Skinnerian.
 
(2) How does constructivism studies like Norman Holland's THE I? Holland, if
you will, is an essentialist since he seems to believe that all
normally-functioning human brains work in the same way. George Lakoff's WOMEN,
FIRE, AND DANGEROUS THINGS is another trans-cultural study that seems to
suggest (in passing) that all human cultures create categories in similar ways.
 
(3) Are other mammals subject to cultural construction? (When I ask this
question around the department my colleagues look at me as if I've lost it!)
But I don't think I'm asking a trivial or frivolous question. By claiming to be
culturally constructed, are we claiming that we have transcend the mammalian
world (if I may put it that way)? Or are we merely claiming that environment is
more important than genes, and that other mammals are also
environmentally-constructed?
 
I'm genuinely interested in these questions, and I hope that some of you are
too.
 
Yours, Bill Godshalk

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