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Home :: Archive :: 1995 :: April ::
Re: Sh on TACT; Sh on BRAVO; 1H4 Welsh
Shakespeare Electronic Conference, Vol. 6, No. 0270.  Thursday, 6 April 1995.
 
(1)     From:   Ian Lancashire <
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        Date:   Thursday, 6 Apr 1995 10:24:04 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Shakespeare for TACT
 
(2)     From:   Patricia Gallagher <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Apr 1995 23:36:10 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   Shakespeare on BRAVO
 
(3)     From:   Roger D. Gross <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 5 Apr 1995 18:36:18 -0500 (CDT)
        Subj:   1H4 Welsh
 
 
(1)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ian Lancashire <
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Date:           Thursday, 6 Apr 1995 10:24:04 -0400 (EDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare for TACT
 
The Oxford University Press electronic Shakespeare, encoded with COCOA markup,
will run with TACT.  Just identify the COCOA tags when you run Makebase on each
play. All folio and many quarto texts prepared by Trevor Howard-Hill for his
series of individual Shakespeare concordances in the late 60s can also be
converted into TACT databases.
 
TACT is available freely by Gopher at gopher.epas.utoronto.ca and on the World
Wide Web at URL http://www.cch.epas.utoronto.ca:8080/cch/tact.html Version
2.1.4 will be released at the end of this month at this site.
 
The Renaissance Electronic Texts edition of Sonnets by Hardy Cook and myself
nears publication.  For COCOA encoding guidelines with TACT, see the RET Web
site at http:/library.utoronto.ca/www/utel/ret/ret.html
 
The MLA TACT manual is in the last stages of copyediting and will be released
with a large number of TACT-encoded texts, including some by Shakespeare.
 
TACT can make a textual database of any ASCII text and its tags.  To do so,
remove the default declaration of angle brackets as tag delimiters when you run
Makebase on a file.
 
Ian Lancashire
Dept. of English, New College
Director, Centre for Computing in the Humanities
Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. M5S 1A1, CANADA
E-mail: ian @ epas.utoronto.ca
 
(2)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Patricia Gallagher <
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Date:           Wednesday, 5 Apr 1995 23:36:10 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare on BRAVO
 
For those interested in the Shakespeare films airing on BRAVO this month, here
is a list of dates:
 
  Henry V (1945) [Olivier]   -  4/15, 26, 27
  Henry V (1989) [Branagh]   -  4/15, 23
  Macbeth (1948) [Welles]    -  4/9, 10, 23, 24
  Macbeth (1971) [Polanski]  -  4/23
  Othello (1965) [Olivier]   -  4/8, 29
  Othello (1966) [Welles]    -  4/8, 23, 24, 27
 
If anyone needs more specific information, please feel free to email me
directly.
 
Patricia Gallagher

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(3)----------------------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Roger D. Gross <
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Date:           Wednesday, 5 Apr 1995 18:36:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject:        1H4 Welsh
 
Peter John Still asks for the Welsh from 1H4, 3.1.  Here it is (with elipses to
save space)
 
MORTIMER:  Good father; tell her that she and my aunt Percy
           Shall follow in your conduct speedily.
GLENDOWER: Na wyla, fy mhlant i.  Ddof gyda thi, pan ddychwela'r
           Boneddiges Perci.
      [trans:  Weep not my child.  I'll speedily conduct you when
         with my Lady Percy, I go thither.]
LADY MORT.:  Ni arhosaf i, ar-ol fynediad f'annwylaf Arglwydd.
      [trans:  I will not stay behind my beloved lord.]
GLENDOWER:   She's desp'rate here, a peevish self-will'd harlotry,
             One that no persuasion can do good upon.
LADY MORT.:  [to Mortimer]  Cariad; oes rhaid i mi aros yma?
      [trans:  Why must my lord leave me behind, forlorn?]
MORTIMER:    ...In such a parley would I answer thee.
LADY MORT.:  Doed a ddelo; mi a ddof gyda thi.
      [trans:  I will come with thee.  Do not deny me!]
MORTIMER:   ...
GLENDOWER:   Nay, if you melt, then will she run mad.
LADY MORT.:  F'arglwydd.  Gorwedd dy ben ar fy gliniau, yma ar y llawr;
             a ganaf wrthyt dy hoff-gan ac wedyn rhodiwn ni yn araf i mewn
             trwy'r ddrysau cwsg.
      [trans:  If my lord will upon the rushes lie
               And lay his noble head upon my lap,
               I'll sing the song I know he loves to hear
               And on his eyelids crown the god of sleep.]
MORTIMER:  ...
GLENDOWER: ...
MORTIMER:  ...
GLENDOWER: ...
HOTSPUR:   ...
LADY HOTSPUR:  Go, ye giddy goose.
GLENDOWER:     O ysbrydion.  Chwi syn hedfan mewn cerbyd y cymylau,
               Deuwch mewn brys o'ch trigfannau nefol
               A chenwch yn swynus cerddoriaeth hedd.
      [trans:  O, ye spirits that ride uupon the bosom of the clouds,
               Come from your airy mansions in all haste
               And charm our ears with music passing sweet.]
 
_________
 
This is thanks to my favorite Welshman, David Jones, Univ. of Utah.  I used it
in my last production of 1H4 and I promise you it is worth the trouble to learn
to speak these lines.  They make the scene pure magic.
 
I have a tape of the lines spoken by an authentic Welsh speaker.  It is in the
old reel-to-reel format.  I'll see if it is still usable and try to get it
transferred to cassette so that I might make copies for those of you who need
them.  Share the rare goodies.
 
I also have a version of the song with melody, the Welsh lyric, and a
translation.  I'll send a photocopy to anyone who requests it by direct e-mail.
 It is called "Dafyddy Garreg Wen"  It works wonderfully.
 
Roger Gross
Univ. of Arkansas
 
PS  Sorry I've been so long without an answer to Michael Swanson re. iambic
pentameter and without the list of most often mispronounced names.  I have had
trouble figuring out how to reduce the answer to a size appropriate for this
forum.
 
One tidbit in hopes of keeping interest alive:  GLENDOWER is a two-syllable
name (GLEN-dar) except for the four times when it appears as the last word in a
verse line (an example of my "last-word variation") in which cases it is a
three-syllable name (glen-DOW-er).
 
OWER is normally a one-syllable unit (as in FLOWER=FLAR; POWER=PAR; TOWER-TAR).
 There are exceptions.  When Shakespeare needs an extra syllable for rhythm, he
uses them. Audiences never consciously note it but they do respond to the
rhythm.
 
Roger
 

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